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Answered 2016-08-23 17:24:26

As stated by the expert:

The First Law of Thermodynamics IS the Law of Conservation of Energy.

The Second Law of Thermodynamics is not directly related; however, it provides additional restrictions, as to what can, and what cannot, be achieved.

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Answered 2016-07-19 23:55:29

The First Law of Thermodynamics IS the Law of Conservation of Energy.The Second Law of Thermodynamics is not directly related; however, it provides additional restrictions, as to what can, and what cannot, be achieved.

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The Second Law of Thermodynamics is equivalent to the Law of Conservation of Energy. The Law of Conservation of Matter is not stated in the laws of Thermodynamics.


The first law is about conservation of energy, the second is about the conservation of entropy.


The second law of thermodynamics states that


First Law of Thermodynamics is also known as Conservation of Energy. Second Law of Thermodynamics means that useful energy is continuously being converted into unusable energy - there are irreversible processes in our Universe, with respect to energy. Read the Wikipedia articles for a more thorough discussion.


You must be referring to the two Laws of Thermodynamics. Stated in terms of energy: 1. The First Law of Thermodynamics is the Law of Conservation of Energy, meaning that energy can not be created or destroyed. 2. However, useful energy is continuously being converted into unusable energy. This is irreversible. This is the Second Law of Thermodynamics.


No, the Law of Conservation of Energy (a.k.a. First Law of Thermodynamics) states that energy CAN NOT be created or destroyed. Converting energy to a less valuable form is related to the Second Law of Thermodynamics.


By the first law of thermodynamics, energy is conserved - i.e. the sum of the useful work and the energy lost to heat will equal the energy you started with. The second law states that you will never get 100% energy efficiency.


For a start, the Law of Conservation of Energy. In case you don't know about it, I suggest you do some reading; it will help you understand not only that stars have to burn out, but several other things as well. Actually it would help to know about both the First Law of Thermodynamics (basically the Law of Conservation of Energy), and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.For a start, the Law of Conservation of Energy. In case you don't know about it, I suggest you do some reading; it will help you understand not only that stars have to burn out, but several other things as well. Actually it would help to know about both the First Law of Thermodynamics (basically the Law of Conservation of Energy), and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.For a start, the Law of Conservation of Energy. In case you don't know about it, I suggest you do some reading; it will help you understand not only that stars have to burn out, but several other things as well. Actually it would help to know about both the First Law of Thermodynamics (basically the Law of Conservation of Energy), and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.For a start, the Law of Conservation of Energy. In case you don't know about it, I suggest you do some reading; it will help you understand not only that stars have to burn out, but several other things as well. Actually it would help to know about both the First Law of Thermodynamics (basically the Law of Conservation of Energy), and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.


No The first law deals with conservation of energy The second law deals with what forms that (conserved) energy may take


Because the second law of thermodynamics states that any use of energy always results in a decrease in the amount of "useful" energy.


You can't create energy out of nothing (First Law of Thermodynamics); this is an experimentally established fact (i.e., no exceptions are known). Nowadays, the law of conservation of energy (or First Law of Thermodynamics) is often derived from Noether's Theorem, but that is some advanced math.You can convert one type of energy to another, but see also the Second Law of Thermodynamics.You can't create energy out of nothing (First Law of Thermodynamics); this is an experimentally established fact (i.e., no exceptions are known). Nowadays, the law of conservation of energy (or First Law of Thermodynamics) is often derived from Noether's Theorem, but that is some advanced math.You can convert one type of energy to another, but see also the Second Law of Thermodynamics.You can't create energy out of nothing (First Law of Thermodynamics); this is an experimentally established fact (i.e., no exceptions are known). Nowadays, the law of conservation of energy (or First Law of Thermodynamics) is often derived from Noether's Theorem, but that is some advanced math.You can convert one type of energy to another, but see also the Second Law of Thermodynamics.You can't create energy out of nothing (First Law of Thermodynamics); this is an experimentally established fact (i.e., no exceptions are known). Nowadays, the law of conservation of energy (or First Law of Thermodynamics) is often derived from Noether's Theorem, but that is some advanced math.You can convert one type of energy to another, but see also the Second Law of Thermodynamics.



The law of conservation of energy basically states that you can't create energy out of nothing. You also can't destroy energy. Energy is a quantity that remains constant, in a closed system (one that has no contact with the outside world). The law of conservation of energy is also called the First Law of Thermodynamics.You can, however, convert useful energy into useless (or unusable) energy - and this can no longer be converted back to useful energy - in other words, there are irreversible processes in nature. This is the Second Law of Thermodynamics.The law of conservation of energy basically states that you can't create energy out of nothing. You also can't destroy energy. Energy is a quantity that remains constant, in a closed system (one that has no contact with the outside world). The law of conservation of energy is also called the First Law of Thermodynamics.You can, however, convert useful energy into useless (or unusable) energy - and this can no longer be converted back to useful energy - in other words, there are irreversible processes in nature. This is the Second Law of Thermodynamics.The law of conservation of energy basically states that you can't create energy out of nothing. You also can't destroy energy. Energy is a quantity that remains constant, in a closed system (one that has no contact with the outside world). The law of conservation of energy is also called the First Law of Thermodynamics.You can, however, convert useful energy into useless (or unusable) energy - and this can no longer be converted back to useful energy - in other words, there are irreversible processes in nature. This is the Second Law of Thermodynamics.The law of conservation of energy basically states that you can't create energy out of nothing. You also can't destroy energy. Energy is a quantity that remains constant, in a closed system (one that has no contact with the outside world). The law of conservation of energy is also called the First Law of Thermodynamics.You can, however, convert useful energy into useless (or unusable) energy - and this can no longer be converted back to useful energy - in other words, there are irreversible processes in nature. This is the Second Law of Thermodynamics.


That is known by two different names: (1) Law of Conservation of Energy, (2) Second Law of Thermodynamics.


It is the idea of a machine continuously producing energy, without energy input - or producing more energy than what is put into the machine. This would violate the First Law of Thermodynamics (conservation of energy), and in general, it is not believed to be possible. No process is known which violates the conservation of energy. (A "perpetual motion machine of the second kind" would violate the Second Law of Thermodynamics; this is generally believed to be impossible, too.)


According to the second law of Thermodynamics, the amount of usable energy will continuously decrease.According to the second law of Thermodynamics, the amount of usable energy will continuously decrease.According to the second law of Thermodynamics, the amount of usable energy will continuously decrease.According to the second law of Thermodynamics, the amount of usable energy will continuously decrease.


The first and second laws apply EVERYWHERE, including ecosystems. Specifically, living beings need energy - and that means, usable energy - to live.


Those would basically be the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. The First Law (energy conservation) states that the total energy can not be increased or decreased. The Second Law imposes some limitations about what conversions are possible.


Due to the second law of thermodynamics, even "renewable" energy yields a net release of heat to the surroundings. An advantage of renewable energy is that it can be a predictable, sustainable source of energy as opposed to fossil fuels extracted from the ground which apparently take millions of years to create through geological processes.


According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, once energy is wasted, it is gone forever - useful energy has become unusable energy.According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, once energy is wasted, it is gone forever - useful energy has become unusable energy.According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, once energy is wasted, it is gone forever - useful energy has become unusable energy.According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, once energy is wasted, it is gone forever - useful energy has become unusable energy.


The First Law is Conservation of Energy (stated in the language of Thermodynamics). Energy can neither be created nor destroyed. The Second Law has many formulations; one of them is that entropy increases. Another is that there are irreversible processes in the Universe - irreversible in the sense of energy processes. In other words, useful energy is constantly being converted into unusable energy.



It is assumed as part of the second law, but the second law is really all about what happens to the energy as it changes form. If energy were not conserved (1st Law), then it might be possible to violate the second law by magically creating some energy out of nowhere to allow the work coming out of a system to be equal to the energy input even when some is lost to heat.


The First Law of Thermodynamics: (Conservation) Energy can be changed from one form to another, but it cannot be created or destroyed. The total amount of energy and matter in the Universe remains constant, merely changing from one form to another. The second law of Thermodynamics: In all energy exchanges, if no energy enters or leaves the system, the potential energy of the state will always be less than that of the initial state. This is also commonly referred to as entropy. I would imagine that energy flows through a rain forest - as it does in any other location!


The second law of thermodynamics states that a system with no energy input and no energy losses will tend toward dissolution.



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