US Presidents

How do they determine how many electoral votes each candidate will get?

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2010-11-15 20:32:03
2010-11-15 20:32:03

Each elector gets one vote and the votes are counted and tallied.

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Kentucky determines how many votes each candidate gets by the popular vote.



Your state determins it on which canidate gets the most votes.



Florida gives all of its electoral votes to the Presidential candidate that received the most votes. This is a winner-take-all system. A majority of votes is not needed, merely a plurality.


All ten of Minnesota's electoral votes go to the Presidential candidate with the most popular votes in the state and his running mate.


Electoral votes in the Electoral College determine the President of the United States. The electors are elected by popular vote in each state and each candidate for elector swears in advance whom he will vote for.


269 electoral votes allocated to each candidate would make a tie.538 total electoral peeps. 269+269=538


Electoral votes in the Electoral College determine the President of the United States. Every state and DC are awarded a certain number of electoral votes with which to elect the President. Each state has electoral votes equal to the total of the 2 representative the state has in the U.S. Senate plus the number of representative the state has in the House of Representatives. The states choose as many electors as it has electoral votes and these electors elect the president. The electors are elected by popular vote in each state and each candidate for elector swears in advance whom he will vote for.


Like most states, Illinois is a "winner-take-all" state. Whichever ticket (presidential candidate and his/her running mate) receives a simple majority of the popular votes within the state gets all 20 of Illinois' electoral votes.


Presidential Primaries determine how many electoral collage votes each candidate gets for the election. determines the party candidate to run in the general election


Electoral votes in the US are the popular vote for each state combined into an electoral. Example - 50,000 people vote for a candidate in one state. 60,000 vote for the other candidate in the same state. The candidate with 60,000 voted in that states gets the electoral vote. Note. A state can have more electoral votes depending on population.


Each elector gets a single vote. So, since Michigan has 16 electors, and 16 electoral points, each elector will get one point, or vote.


Each state gets there own set number of electoral votes. If a candidate wins in that state, they get the electoral votes of that state.


10 electoral votes - 1 for each district and 1 for each Senator Maryland has ten electoral votes, but unfortunately little say in which candidate receives them. In 2007 the state of Maryland became the first state in the union to 'drop out' of the electoral college. All ten votes go to the candidate receiving the most popular vote in the union.


Voters cast ballots for the President in an election. Each state has a number of electoral votes. When a candidate wins the popular vote for THAT state, they are awarded the electoral votes for that state. The candidate with the greatest number of electoral votes (not the greatest number of popular votes) is the winner of the election


If no president candidate receive a majority of electoral votes, the president is elected by the House of Representatives. Each state is allowed one vote.


In U.S. Presidential elections, D.C. and every state except Nebraska and Maine gives 100% of their electoral votes to the candidate who gets the most popular votes within their state. In Nebraska and Maine, two electoral votes go to the candidate who gets the most popular votes within each state, and one electoral vote goes to the candidate who gets the most popular votes in each of the states' congressional districts.


Nebraska and Maine are the only states that allow their votes to be split. All the other states and DC use the winner takes all system.(In Maine and Nebraska, only 2 electoral votes go to the candidate with the most popular votes of each state. Each additional electoral vote goes to the candidate with the most popular votes in each congressional district.)


The states choose as many "electors" as it has electoral votes and these electors elect the president. The electors are elected by popular vote in each state and each candidate for elector swears in advance whom he will vote for. The electors vote their electoral votes in the Electoral College.


The primary elections are used to select the candidate for each party. There are no electoral votes associated with a primary election. Electoral votes are won by the winner in the General Election on Election Day.


All states but Nebraska and Maine award all their electoral votes to one candidate Nebraska and Maine award one vote to the winner in each congressional district and two votes to the state-wide leader. Some states such as California award all their votes to the national leader in popular votes. Most states award all their votes to the state-wide winner in popular vote.


Like most states, Minnesota gives 100% of its electoral votes to the winner of the popular vote in the state.


The public votes to select who the Electoral delegates will vote for. In most states, state law dictates that the Electoral delegates must vote for the candidate who won their state's election. At least one state awards Electoral votes to the candidate who wins each Congressional district.


One could win the US presidential election without the ten states with the highest number of electoral votes (256), although since numbers nine through eleven each have 15 votes if all eleven of the states with the most electoral votes went for one candidate there is no way the other candidate could win (271 votes against). In the 'top ten ' scenario, all of the remaining states, with the exception of Massachusetts (12 votes) would have to be won by the candidate collecting electoral votes from the smaller (when calculated by electoral votes) states.



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