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2009-01-27 00:07:28
2009-01-27 00:07:28

The only way to change a deed is to execute a new one. If the owners are now married they should have a new deed drafted by an attorney that creates a tenancy by the entirety.

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Yes. But the deed and mortgage would have to be in her name. It would not be your property.Yes. But the deed and mortgage would have to be in her name. It would not be your property.Yes. But the deed and mortgage would have to be in her name. It would not be your property.Yes. But the deed and mortgage would have to be in her name. It would not be your property.


Yes. If the legal owner transfers the property to you by their deed.Yes. If the legal owner transfers the property to you by their deed.Yes. If the legal owner transfers the property to you by their deed.Yes. If the legal owner transfers the property to you by their deed.


If your name is on the deed then you own the property as long as the deed is valid and properly recorded in the land records.


If your name is on the deed then you own the property. You do not need to be married to own property. If two people are named on the deed they each own a 50% interest in the property and each have the right to the use and possession of the whole property.


No. If you are on the mortgage you should also be on the deed.


If you are on the deed to the property you own a one half interest.If you are on the deed to the property you own a one half interest.If you are on the deed to the property you own a one half interest.If you are on the deed to the property you own a one half interest.


There is no 'form' to 'remove' a name off a deed. Rights in real property are transferred by virtue of a deed. The owner must execute a deed granting their rights in the property to a new owner.


You cannot remove someone's name from a deed with a letter of any sort. That person needs to sign a deed that transfers their interest in the property to a new owner.You cannot remove someone's name from a deed with a letter of any sort. That person needs to sign a deed that transfers their interest in the property to a new owner.You cannot remove someone's name from a deed with a letter of any sort. That person needs to sign a deed that transfers their interest in the property to a new owner.You cannot remove someone's name from a deed with a letter of any sort. That person needs to sign a deed that transfers their interest in the property to a new owner.


You can't get someone's name off a deed. He needs to execute a deed voluntarily that transfers his interest in the property to you. You will likely need to buy him out.You can't get someone's name off a deed. He needs to execute a deed voluntarily that transfers his interest in the property to you. You will likely need to buy him out.You can't get someone's name off a deed. He needs to execute a deed voluntarily that transfers his interest in the property to you. You will likely need to buy him out.You can't get someone's name off a deed. He needs to execute a deed voluntarily that transfers his interest in the property to you. You will likely need to buy him out.


The only way to change the name on a deed is for the owner of the property to execute a new deed transferring the property to new owners or to herself and another co-owner or through a straw and back to herself under her new name.


If the deed was in your name that implies you transferred the property at some time. If you transferred the property then the title is no longer in your name.If that is the case the property has a new owner and you have no power to transfer the property "back" to yourself. The new owner must execute a deed that transfers their interest back to you.


No. Ownership of real property is evidenced by a deed not by a letter.No. Ownership of real property is evidenced by a deed not by a letter.No. Ownership of real property is evidenced by a deed not by a letter.No. Ownership of real property is evidenced by a deed not by a letter.


It depends on what the deed says. If the deed is a right of survivorship, the property will go to the descendants of the last to die. If it is a joint ownership, the property could go to the beneficiaries of all three of the decedents.


The deed/title to any property determines the legal ownership, not the mortgage. If you are not named on the deed to the property, you have no "automatic" ownership rights.


No. In order to be the owner of real property you must be named as grantee on the deed. If your name is on the mortgage but not on the deed you have obligated yourself to pay for real property you do not own. If the primary borrower defaults the lender will go after you for full payment of the mortgage yet you do not own the property.


Ownership of property is transferred by a deed or by a probate proceeding. The present owner of the property must execute a deed that names you as the grantee. If you inherited the property you should consult with the attorney who handled the estate if you want the property transferred to you by a deed.


If the owner of the property died and left the property to you in their will their estate must be probated in order for the title to the property to pass to you legally. Once the will has been probated you are the owner of the property. A deed is not necessary. However, if you wish to have the property transferred to yourself by a deed you could arrange to have the attorney who handled the estate draft a deed for you.


If you conveyed your property to you and your son thn he has a half interest in the property. To get the property back into your name alone he would need to sign a quitclaim deed that conveys his interest to you.


No. You cannot remove a spouse's name from a mortgage or a deed. If you want their interest in the property they must execute a deed voluntarily, transferring their interest to you. You may need to buy them out.No. You cannot remove a spouse's name from a mortgage or a deed. If you want their interest in the property they must execute a deed voluntarily, transferring their interest to you. You may need to buy them out.No. You cannot remove a spouse's name from a mortgage or a deed. If you want their interest in the property they must execute a deed voluntarily, transferring their interest to you. You may need to buy them out.No. You cannot remove a spouse's name from a mortgage or a deed. If you want their interest in the property they must execute a deed voluntarily, transferring their interest to you. You may need to buy them out.


If you are speaking of a deed of real estate property to a business, you would either have to (1) deed the property from the business to someone else, or (2) file a correction deed relating back to the original transaction.


Have a deed prepared wherein husband signs deed deeding property to him and his wife.


You need to obtain a copy of the deed from the land records office and check the tenancy recited in the deed to your father-in-law and his grandaughter. If they were joint tenants then the property passed to her when he died and she now owns it. If there was no tenancy recited then it is probable that they were tenants-in-common and his half interest would pass to his heirs. In most states the default tenancy for unmarried co-owners is tenancy-in-common.


No. You have no such property rights.No. You have no such property rights.No. You have no such property rights.No. You have no such property rights.


my aunt left me property in her will, and now I would like to sell the property, but I don't have a clear deed. how do i get a clear deed to the property so that I can sell the property?


The simplest thing to do is file a copy of the marriage certificate with the deed. Or you can do a quit claim deed with the new name.



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