answersLogoWhite
Science
Chemistry
Elements and Compounds
Atoms and Atomic Structure

How do you determine the charge of an ion?

1

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
2014-09-17 16:35:48
2014-09-17 16:35:48

The charge of an ion is a result of the atom gaining or losing electrons. Determining this is the difference between the number of protons and the current number of electrons. For instance, an atom of potassium that has lost an electron would have a +1 charge.

1

Related Questions

User Avatar

Ionic compounds follow the octet rule.

User Avatar

An ion does have a charge. That is what makes it an ion.

User Avatar

This is the electrical charge of the ion.

User Avatar

What is the charge for a lithium ion

User Avatar

The charge on a sulfide ion

User Avatar

The bromide ion has a 1- charge.

User Avatar

A strontium ion has a charge of +2

User Avatar

1+ is the charge on the rubidium ion.

User Avatar

The ion charge of cesium is +1.

User Avatar

The hydroxide ion has a 1- charge.

User Avatar

An ion with a positive charge is a cation.

User Avatar

The charge of the molybdenum ion is +2.

User Avatar

The charge of a sodium ion is +1.

User Avatar

A silver ion has a charge of +1

User Avatar

A gallium ion will have a charge of 3+.

User Avatar

Bromide ion= -1 charge

User Avatar

An acid has to have a positive charge on a atom or molecule delivering the acid, Therefore any atom with a charge is an ion and it is a electrolyte because any solution that has free ion is determine as an electrolyte.

User Avatar

The charge of the lead ion in PBI2 is +2, as the charge of a iodine ion is -1 and the net charge of a compound must be 0.)

User Avatar

The Ag ion takes a charge of +1

User Avatar

The charge of Bromine (Br) as an ion is -1.

User Avatar

The charge of Phosphorous (P) as an ion is -3.

User Avatar

A bromide ion has a charge of -1.

User Avatar

An ion is an atom with a positive or negative charge.

User Avatar

A fluorine ion has a charge of minus one.

User Avatar

In an ionic compound ions will always combine in a ratio that produces a net charge of zero. For example, the calcium ion has a 2+ charge and the chloride ion has a 1- charge. Therefore there the formula of calcium chloride is CaCl2, with 1 calcium ion and 2 chloride ions. In another example, the aluminum ion carries a 3+ charge and the oxide ion carries a 2- charge. Therefore 2 aluminum ions will combine with 3 oxide ions to form Al2O3.


Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.