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How do you find the owner of certain property in Bangalore?

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2013-05-23 02:01:38
2013-05-23 02:01:38

You can find the owners of certain properties in Bangalore by looking up the owners in public records at the many local municipal offices, for instance.

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You need to hire a professional. A professional title examiner can perform a title examination to find the owner of the property. If the property is listed as "owner unknown" in the tax assessor's records the research may be costly.


In the United States, the land owner would own the fossils and gems.


If it is your property then you are the title holder. You can check the owner of any property by visiting the local assessor's office or the local land records office. The owner of a property by deed holds the title to the property.If it is your property then you are the title holder. You can check the owner of any property by visiting the local assessor's office or the local land records office. The owner of a property by deed holds the title to the property.If it is your property then you are the title holder. You can check the owner of any property by visiting the local assessor's office or the local land records office. The owner of a property by deed holds the title to the property.If it is your property then you are the title holder. You can check the owner of any property by visiting the local assessor's office or the local land records office. The owner of a property by deed holds the title to the property.


To find the legal owner of the property you can visit the local tax assessor's office and look up that address in the records. The property will be listed under the name of the legal owner. You may also find a deed reference that you can use to look up that property in the local land records office.


The site below matches property owners with caretakers. The property owner can place a free caretaker required ad . Applications are then forwarded to the property owner by the website. <a href="http://www.caretaker-jobs.com">www.caretaker-jobs.com</a>


Visit the local land records office and check the owner of the property for liens.Visit the local land records office and check the owner of the property for liens.Visit the local land records office and check the owner of the property for liens.Visit the local land records office and check the owner of the property for liens.


Go to Assessors office in your town with the specific address of the property and they will locate the owner base on tax mapping.


You would search the tax appraisers property records. See the related link below.


Call your local county Assessors office Give the address and they can tell who is the legal owner of the property.


I think you will find a clause regarding access in your lease agreement. You cannot keep the owner of the property off of it.


Property may be owned in Canada by the people, by government, businesses and native groups. In order to find who owns the property in Canada, one must first find out if it is personally or corporately owned.


You would need to do a search of the land registry to find out the current owner of the property.


Copy the address and inquire at the county clerks office. Find the owner, sale price, tax burden, size and shape of land, appraisement, whether taxes are paid-up, what utilities are present.



Only if you know for certain who the rightful owner is. it depends on what it is


There are two places you can check to determine the present owner of a property. You can check the assessor's records in the town where the property is located. They should be able to provide the name of the present owner. If a trust owns the property it's name will listed as the owner. Next you can check the local land records office. The staff can help you find the present owner's deed. If the property was transferred to a trust there should be a recorded deed to that effect. Whoever recorded the last deed for the property is the record owner.



No . Not unless the owner agreed in writing to pay storage fees. You can check the laws for abandoned property in your state. You may find that you have the right to dispose of the property after six years of free storage.No . Not unless the owner agreed in writing to pay storage fees. You can check the laws for abandoned property in your state. You may find that you have the right to dispose of the property after six years of free storage.No . Not unless the owner agreed in writing to pay storage fees. You can check the laws for abandoned property in your state. You may find that you have the right to dispose of the property after six years of free storage.No . Not unless the owner agreed in writing to pay storage fees. You can check the laws for abandoned property in your state. You may find that you have the right to dispose of the property after six years of free storage.


You can ask an owner, or you can go to the local hall of records and find the name of the land owner. Most home owner associations are non-profit corporations, and are listed with the state, in the Secretary of State's office of records.


To find the owner of a property in the US you can check in two places. First, check at the assessor's office in the town where the property is located. If you look up the address in the assessor's listings it should show the owner and possibly a deed reference. The second source is your local land records office. At many land records offices an address can be checked to find the owner of property. If there is no listing by address, then use the name you found at the assessor's office to find the owner's deed reference. Many towns have made their information available online. Search for assessor's and land records in your locality.


Lost property is when property was inadvertently left in a place where the true owner can no longer find it. Mislaid property is when property was intentionally put in a particular place, but the true owner then forgets where he left it. For both lost and mislaid property, the true owner retains actual ownership of the property for a reasonable time after the property was lost or mislaid. The finder of lost or mislaid property must retain the property for a reasonable amount of time, and must make reasonable efforts to locate the true owner. In many jurisdictions the length of time and the actions required may be defined by local statute or ordinance. If the true owner cannot be found, the rights to lost property go to the person who found the property. The rights to mislaid property go to the owner of the location where the mislaid property was found. The reason for the difference is that the law wants to maximize the chance of returning the item to the true owner. The rights to mislaid property stay with the property owner because it is more likely that the owner of mislaid property will return to the location where it was mislaid. Example 1: A wallet is found on the ground outside a restaurant. It is unlikely the wallet was intentionally placed on the ground. Therefore the wallet is lost, and the rights to the wallet will transfer to the finder, assuming the finder makes reasonable efforts to locate the true owner. Example 2: A wallet is found on a table inside a restaurant. It is likely that the owner placed the wallet on the table, and then forgot to take it with him. Therefore the wallet is mislaid. The rights to the wallet will transfer to the owner of the restaurant, assuming the owner makes reasonable efforts to locate the true owner.


Check the tax appraisal records for the property and see who is listed as the owner.


In most states the County Clerk's office will have the recorded documents for the property in question including the current owner.


You can take the address you have to the city assessor's office to find the name of the present owner of the property. Then you take that information to the land records office and ask the staff how to track the title to the property backwards using the information you have about the present owner.



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