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Answered 2009-07-29 13:09:58

You'll need to contact the bank that holds the loan. They will give you contact information for the repo agent, who is required by law to make your personal property available for you. There is generally a small storage fee that you'll need to pay when retrieving personal property, which is allowed by law, and compensates the agent for inventorying and storing the property.

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