answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

Borderline personality is, in the simplest form, a person tending to put things into as they are too good and other things as too bad, like a person or patient with this disorder when admitted to the hospital will say the morning staff nurses are good while the evening staff nurses are bad. and he will then tend to idealise the morning staff and so on. The people usually have a mood that swings off and on. Looking at their track of relationships they will have unstablities; they will be or will not be visited of feelings of emptiness or boredom and anger to events or situations which will appear not appropriate to normal people.

AnswerThe Answer above is totally right but left out that anyone with Borderline personality(BLP) Will have the feeling of being lonely and will try real hard to make friends and the friends they do make the will cling to them one moment and lash out at them the next moment. They will also do this to loved ones. Also borderline personality people are trapped on a emotional roller coaster, bewildered and depressed by their explosive and unpredictable behavior. If you know a loved one who has BLP then they need to get help ASAP because BLP if untreated the person can become very explosive, VIOLENT, and sometimes suicidal. Please if you can get this person help ASAP because no one should have to deal with BLP!! P.S. I know Alot about BLP Because I have BLP and have had it for 17 years now! TRY READING = STOP WALKING ON EQQSHELL (TAKING YOUR LIFE BACK WHEN SOMEONE YOU CARE ABOUT HAS BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DIORDER)

----

I also have Borderline and my take on it is you feel incredibly needy, needing constant reassurance that you are cared for. It does make you feel incredibly lonely and you do tend to put ppl you care for on pedestals until you perceive some slight and then you devalue them, getting angry or just pushing them away. Borderliners are likely to be very impulsive and often will do dangerous and extreme things, mine was riding my motorcycle at increasingly high speeds to be able to relax. Borderliners also are known for self haming and behaviour that may lead to severe injury and are likely to commit or attempt suicide. The core of BPD is abandonment fear, emptiness and anxiety from tying to avoid such feelings. OH I also recomment the Walking on Eggshells book!!

Multiple Personality Disorder (properly known as Dissociative Personality Disorder) is a condition where two or more separate personalities exist within the same mind. It is usually caused by severe, repetitive childhood trauma.

DPD can be a serious problem, or well-managed by the individual. Some types of therapy can often be useful in helping people with DPD learn to cope with their situation.

User Avatar

Wiki User

โˆ™ 2011-09-13 05:00:16
This answer is:
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: How do you know if someone has borderline personality disorder and how do you get them help?
Write your answer...
Submit
Related questions

How do you deal with a person who has borderline personality disorder?

Stay away from them until they get ongoing help.


How do you quit stalking?

Get help! Talk to a priest or minister, see a psychiatrist because you might have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or Borderline Personality Disorder and be in need of medication and talk therapy.


Anyone ever taken Topamax for borderline personality disorder?

Did not know this med could help with that. Concerned about a family member with a problem like this.


How can you treat a borderline personality disorder?

Working with a therapist to learn ways to cope and seeing a psychiatrist about possible medications that may help stabilize your moods. Most importantly in this disorder is talk therapy.


What can you do about my sister borderlinE personality disorder?

Encourage her to seek "Dialectical Behavioral Therapy" with a psychologist in her area. A local university's psychology department or the state psychological association where she lives may be able to give her a referral. support her as mutch as you can its really important learn more about borderline personality disorder that way youll be able to help her more


If you have manic bipolar AND borderline personality disorder and an explosive disoredr can it help you if you are charged with drug charges?

Usually when drugs are involved and you have legal charges, it then goes into the law, and the government.


How can you stop cutting myself?

This is one of the symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder. You should see a therapist to get some help if you really want to stop this self-destructive behavior.


What are so mental disorders?

Mental health disorders are psychosocial issues which are grouped into certain categories to help us better identify the likely causes and treatments of the disorders (anxiety disorders, personality disorders, psychotic disorders).... Some mental diagnoses include: bipolar disorder borderline personality disorder obsessive compulsive disorder generalized anxiety disorder schizophrenia anorexia


What are the symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder?

The main feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a pervasive pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image and emotions. People with borderline personality disorder are also usually very impulsive.This disorder occurs in most by early adulthood. The unstable pattern of interacting with others has persisted for years and is usually closely related to the person's self-image and early social interactions. The pattern is present in a variety of settings (e.g., not just at work or home) and often is accompanied by a similar lability (fluctuating back and forth, sometimes in a quick manner) in a person's emotions and feelings. Relationships and the person's emotion may often be characterized as being shallow.A person with this disorder will also often exhibit impulsive behaviors and have a majority of the following symptoms:Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonmentA pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships characterized by alternating between extremes of idealization and devaluationIdentity disturbance, such as a significant and persistent unstable self-image or sense of selfImpulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-damaging (e.g., spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating)Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-mutilating behaviorEmotional instability due to significant reactivity of mood (e.g., intense episodic dysphoria, irritability, or anxiety usually lasting a few hours and only rarely more than a few days)Chronic feelings of emptinessInappropriate, intense anger or difficulty controlling anger (e.g., frequent displays of temper, constant anger, recurrent physical fights)Transient, stress-related paranoid thoughts or severe dissociative symptomsAs with all personality disorders, the person must be at least 18 years old before they can be diagnosed with it.Borderline personality disorder is more prevalent in females (75 percent of diagnoses made are in females). It is thought that borderline personality disorder affects approximately 2 percent of the general population.Like most personality disorders, borderline personality disorder typically will decrease in intensity with age, with many people experiencing few of the most extreme symptoms by the time they are in the 40s or 50s.Details about Borderline Personality Disorder SymptomsFrantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment.The perception of impending separation or rejection, or the loss of external structure, can lead to profound changes in self-image, emotion, thinking and behavior. Someone with borderline personality disorder will be very sensitive to things happening around them in their environment. They experience intense abandonment fears and inappropriate anger, even when faced with a realistic separation or when there are unavoidable changes in plans. For instance, becoming very angry with someone for being a few minutes late or having to cancel a lunch date. People with borderline personality disorder may believe that this abandonment implies that they are "bad." These abandonment fears are related to an intolerance of being alone and a need to have other people with them. Their frantic efforts to avoid abandonment may include impulsive actions such as self-mutilating or suicidal behaviors.Unstable and intense relationships.People with borderline personality disorder may idealize potential caregivers or lovers at the first or second meeting, demand to spend a lot of time together, and share the most intimate details early in a relationship. However, they may switch quickly from idealizing other people to devaluing them, feeling that the other person does not care enough, does not give enough, is not "there" enough. These individuals can empathize with and nurture other people, but only with the expectation that the other person will "be there" in return to meet their own needs on demand. These individuals are prone to sudden and dramatic shifts in their view of others, who may alternately be seen as beneficient supports or as cruelly punitive. Such shifts other reflect disillusionment with a caregiver whose nurturing qualities had been idealized or whose rejection or abandonment is expected.Identity disturbance.There are sudden and dramatic shifts in self-image, characterized by shifting goals, values and vocational aspirations. There may be sudden changes in opinions and plans about career, sexual identity, values and types of friends. These individuals may suddenly change from the role of a needy supplicant for help to a righteous avenger of past mistreatment. Although they usually have a self-image that is based on being bad or evil, individuals with borderline personality disorder may at times have feelings that they do not exist at all. Such experiences usually occur in situations in which the individual feels a lack of a meaningful relationship, nurturing and support. These individuals may show worse performance in unstructured work or school situations.You can also learn more about the detailed characteristics of borderline personality disorder.How is Borderline Personality Disorder Diagnosed?Personality disorders such as borderline personality disorder are typically diagnosed by a trained mental health professional, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist. Family physicians and general practitioners are generally not trained or well-equipped to make this type of psychological diagnosis. So while you can initially consult a family physician about this problem, they should refer you to a mental health professional for diagnosis and treatment. There are no laboratory, blood or genetic tests that are used to diagnose borderline personality disorder. Many people with borderline personality disorder don't seek out treatment. People with personality disorders, in general, do not often seek out treatment until the disorder starts to significantly interfere or otherwise impact a person's life. This most often happens when a person's coping resources are stretched too thin to deal with stress or other life events.A diagnosis for borderline personality disorder is made by a mental health professional comparing your symptoms and life history with those listed here. They will make a determination whether your symptoms meet the criteria necessary for a personality disorder diagnosis.Causes of Borderline Personality DisorderResearchers today don't know what causes borderline personality disorder. There are many theories, however, about the possible causes of borderline personality disorder. Most professionals subscribe to a biopsychosocial model of causation - that is, the causes of are likely due to biological and genetic factors, social factors (such as how a person interacts in their early development with their family and friends and other children), and psychological factors (the individual's personality and temperament, shaped by their environment and learned coping skills to deal with stress). This suggests that no single factor is responsible - rather, it is the complex and likely intertwined nature of all three factors that are important. If a person has this personality disorder, research suggests that there is a slightly increased risk for this disorder to be "passed down" to their children. Treatment of Borderline Personality DisorderTreatment of borderline personality disorder typically involves long-term psychotherapy with a therapist that has experience in treating this kind of personality disorder. Medications may also be prescribed to help with specific troubling and debilitating symptoms. For more information about treatment, please see borderline personality disorder treatment.


How do you correct possessive personality disorder?

Possessive personality disorder is a disorder that has no real cure. However seeing a therapist and partaking in counseling sessions may help one overcome the disorder.


Is there a such thing as a borderline bipolar disorder that becomes active in women only during a time when she is involved in intimate relationships with men who are really smart?

Sounds way too complicated to be true. You either have borderline personality disorder or you don't - it does not "activate" only at certain times.There is no such thing as a borderline bipolar - they are two different mental illnesses.I would advise this woman to seek a good therapist who can help her figure out what exactly is going on during these relationships.


Different Types Of Personality Disorders?

Personality disorders are a group of serious mental disturbances that affect the life of sufferers and their loved ones. Personality disorders are notorious for the damage that they do to relationships. This is a brief overview of major personality disorders. There are effective treatments for all of these disorders, though it can be extremely difficult to convince those with personality disorders to seek treatment. Avoidant Avoidant personality disorder is manifested by the avoidance of social situations due to a sense of extreme inferiority. Borderline personality disorder People with this disorder are impulsive, lack a cohesive sense of self, and struggle to maintain relationships. They are often in and out of relationships and in turmoil when dating someone. Histrionic personality disorder People with this disorder try to get attention at all costs, no matter how odd the scheme might be. There is a history of extreme emotionality that is inappropriate. Narcissistic personality disorder When someone has this type of disorder, they have a feeling that they are better than others. Their belief if their abilities are usually much grander than the abilities that they actually have. Causes of personality disorders can be biological and genetic or social. Each person’s circumstances are different and there is no one definitive cause of personality disorders. What is known as that it’s usually a combination of biological and environmental factors. Each of these disorders is treatable, yet they are some of the most difficult to treat disorders because people with personality disorders typically don’t realize there’s anything wrong with them. Narcissists don’t understand what they’re doing wrong. People with borderline personality are unable to perceive their actions as irrational. The result is that people with these kinds of disorder frequently go without help for years until they’ve suffered from the other repercussions of the disorder, which is frequently substance abuse or violent episodes, for some of the disorders. When someone is diagnosed with a personality disorder, there will be therapy available to help them form a more cohesive personality with more realistic expectations and beliefs about the self. Feelings of inadequacy, or grandiosity, will be replaced with a more middle-of-the road view of self that is healthy.


How does a mental institution treat people with borderline personality disorder?

Not so well due to stigma & lack of knowledge,but some can be specialized for this disorder & know how to help BPDs effectivelyIf you are referring to how BPD is treated see this answered question:How_do_you_treat_borderline_personality_disorder


How do you know if someone has borderline personality disorder?

Go to a therapist if you suspect it and check Web MD and other accredited sources to understand and recognize the symptoms. It's a very complex mental health disorder that include distorted thinking, mood swings, and sensitivity. It's something to get help for right away and to never take lightly. If the person wants to get treatment and stick with it, it is worth every dime and every struggle along the way. Recovery is beyond worth it. Best of luck, In recovery from Borderline


What do you do if you think you have an undiagnosed personality disorder?

You go to your General Practitioner (the doctor who you see for checkups) and ask for a referral to a psychiatrist. Explain why you think that you should see a psychiatrist. During your appointment with a psychiatrist, tell him/her that you think that you have a personality disorder and explain why. The psychiatrist will either ease your fears by telling you that you don't have a personality disorder or tell you that you have a personality disorder. In the event that you do have one, the psychiatrist will set up appointments to help you with your personality disorder.


Tips for Friends and Family of Someone Suffering from Multiple Personality Disorder?

If you love someone who suffers from multiple personality disorder, it may be hard to relate or deal with them at times. There are some simple things that can be done to help maintain your relationship with that person. For example, never take any interactions personally from a person suffering from multiple personality disorder. Most times, a person with multiple personality disorder does not realize that they have changed personalities, so they may not understand why or even realize that they've upset you by something they've suddenly done. Take the words they say and actions they do with a grain of salt.


How do you treat Arrested Development and narcissistic personality disorder?

divine intervention or professional help


Your colleague will scream at you throw fits be jealous ignore you tells you to leave and then helps you - what is all this?

Your colleague may suffer from Borderline Personality Disorder. There is not much you can do about it except to learn a bit and hope for the best. Check the link below, and see if the information is of any help.


Are dual disorders possible such as narcissism and bipolar?

Yes. I have been to see a psychologist for help with my 69 year old mother-in-law, who, according to my husband, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in the 80's. According to the doctor many of these personality disorders can overlap. Without seeing my MIL personally, but hearing about her total lack of boundaries and abusive history with her own children and what she has subjected me to, she believes she is suffering from borderline/narcissistic personality disorder.


How can you overcome personality disorder?

Seek professional help from your doctor. They can decide on the best course of action for you.


What do you do when your husband gets angry and pins you against the wall and threatens you with a knife then stabs it repeatedly in the wall next to your head?

You get the hell out of there and get a restraining order and divorce him. Are you out of your mind even asking? There is abosolutly no reason to live under these conditions. This is how women get killed and abused because they don't leave. There is help out there-get it-NOW! Stalkers and the Borderline Personality The Borderline Personality In recent years psychologists have learned about and done case studies on a new personality disorder which the DSM-III-R classifies as an Axis II disorder- the Borderline Personality . This classification includes such personality disorders as the Anti-social Personality, the Histrionic Personality and the Narcissistic Personality. Several psychologists (including myself) diagonosed my stalker as afflicted with the Borderline Personality. Characteristic of the Borderline (derived from research done by Kreisman & Straus, 1989) are: a shaky sense of identity sudden, violent outbursts oversensitivity to real or imagined rejection brief, turbulent love affairs frequent periods of intense depression eating disorders, drug abuse, and other self-destructive tendencies an irrational fear of abandonment and an inability to be alone Not much research has been done on the Borderline Personality, and for many years it was difficult to diagnose- and to treat. A Borderline often feels as though his/her life is marked with a distinctive emptiness; a void in which a relationship often acts to fill. Many times the Borderline is a victim of an early dysfunctional family situation and/or emotional/physical abuse by those he/she trusted early on in childhood. The Borderline is psychotic , in the original, psychological meaning of the term: he/she is not in control and not in touch with reality. To the Borderline, a softly spoken word of advice can be construed as a threat on his/her emotional stability. An outsider's viewpoint that the Borderline is not in touch with reality often ends in a bitter and irrational dissassociation from the outsider on the part of the Borderline. Often, the Borderline ends up very much alone and victim to his/her disillusions. The Borderline stalker is very apt to see his/her actions as perfectly justified; he/she has paranoid disillusions which support these-often with disturbing frequency. The Borderline often has brief love affairs which end abruptly, turbulently and leave the Borderline with enhanced feelings of self-hatred, self-doubt and a fear that is not often experienced by rational people. When the Borderline's relationships turn sour, the Borderline often begins to, at first, harass the estranged partner with unnecessary apologies and/or apologetic behavior (i.e. letters of apology 'from the heart', flowers delivered at one's place of employment, early morning weeping phonecalls, etc.). However, the Borderline does not construe his/her behavior as harassment- to the Borderline he/she is being 'responsible' for his/her past behaviors. The next phase of the Borderline Personality develops relatively quickly and soon he/she feels suddenly betrayed, hurt, etc. and seeks to victimize the estranged partner in any way he/she can Strangely enough, this deleterious behavior is always coupled with a need to be near or in constant contact with the estranged partner . While sending threats to the estranged partner, it is very common for the Borderline to begin to stalk his/her estranged partner in an effort to maintain contact. This effort is motivated by the excruciating fear that the Borderline will end up alone and anger that [the estranged partner] has put him/her in this position. We are finding, in many cases, that a great deal of stalking behavior is associated with Borderline or related personality disorders. Earlier research did not incorporate the Borderline Personality in stalking profiles; research now is beginning to focus on the Borderline in such disorders as Erotomania, etc.


How do you live with somebody with borderline personality disorder?

Answer: As someone with Borderline Peronality Disorder I can only say that you will need to understand the condition to understand the BPD's behaviour. BPD will cause someone to be very needy of love and care and they will have such fears that they constantly question that love and care thus needing constant reassurance. When things are good you will be idolised, placed on a pedestal. However when the sensitive BPD person perceives a slight or feels unloved they can become aggressive and react strongly to their fear of abandonment. BPD sufferers are inately terrified of being abandoned. I agree with the comment below, we do suffer with mood swings and we do feel terribly empty. Our behaviour can be challenging. However, I find that if someone truly understands out behaviour and handles it it makes the borderliner feel safer and much more secure. There is a book called "Walking on Eggshells" I recommend you read.. ------------------------------------ I assume that you may live with this person because they are related to you or are of some importance to you. People with borderline personality disorder have frequent erratic mood swings, and reoccuring feelings of emptiness, they need constant love and care. You must understand that people with this particular disorder are very dependant, but unlike dependent personality disorder when they feel wronged by someone instead of getting submissive, they get very hostile and angry towards the people they are closest too. I hope that this person you live with has some sort of therapy, or medications to help treat the symptoms of borderline. This disorder is very tough to overcome and takes many years of psychotherapy. It is most likely that this person does not just have borderline and has one or more other mental disorders, because borderline is usually accompanied by something else. Just remember that in the borderline's mind they really think that they are right when they accuse or get upset with you, they need alot of attention, and most cannot stand being separated from an important person in their life, they have a lack of object constancy and fear that the loved one may never return. They may also show signs of self-harm or suicidal tendencies, it is very important to watch out for these types of symptoms, they are very dangerous. The borderline is very impulsive and acts on the current situation rather than the whole picture when it comes to things. You have to be a very understanding, patient, considerate, and caring person to be able to live with someone who has been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder But it is really important to talk with their doctor about a plan for overcoming the illness.


Is it possible to help a sociopath?

No, not really. Sociopathy is a personality disorder, and unlike a mental illness these cannot be "cured".


Personality disorders?

DefinitionPersonality disorders are a group of psychiatric conditions in which chronic behavior patterns cause serious problems with relationships and work.Causes, incidence, and risk factorsThe exact cause of personality disorders is unknown. However, many genetic and environmental factors are thought to play a role.Mental health professionals categorize these disorders into the following types:Antisocial personality disorderAvoidant personality disorderBorderline personality disorderDependent personality disorderHistrionic personality disorderNarcissistic personality disorderObsessive-compulsive personality disorderParanoid personality disorderSchizoid personality disorderSchizotypal personality disorderSymptomsSymptoms vary widely depending on the specific type of personality disorder.People with personality disorders have difficulty dealing with everyday stresses and problems, and they often have stormy relationships with others. These conditions vary from mild to severe.Signs and testsPersonality disorders are diagnosed based on a psychological evaluation and the history and severity of the symptoms.TreatmentPeople with these disorders usually do not seek treatment on their own. They tend to seek help once their behavior has caused severe problems in their relationships or jobs, or when they are diagnosed with another psychiatric problem, such as a mood or substance abuse disorder.Although personality disorders are difficult to treat, there is increasing evidence that both medications and some forms of talk therapy can help many people.Expectations (prognosis)The outlook varies. Some personality disorders diminish during middle age without any treatment, while others persist throughout life despite treatment.ComplicationsProblems with interpersonal relationshipsProblems with careerOther psychiatric disordersCalling your health care providerCall for an appointment with your health care provider or mental health professional if you or someone close to you has symptoms of a personality disorder.ReferencesMoore DP, Jefferson JW, eds. Handbook of Medical Psychiatry. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2004: chaps 134-143.


Why does an abusive man try to break down your personality and social life and self-esteem?

I call this "the web" in others words the old quote "said the spider to the fly." The first thing an abusive man does when he has your confidence is to alienate you from family and friends because he wants total control of you and he doesn't want you telling tales behind his back as to how he treats you. These men know abuse is wrong, but they are sick, need help and most of them never get it or want to get it. What he is doing is brain-washing you. He is stripping you of your own identity by not allowing you to have a social life and making sure he brain-washes you into the fact you are a useless lump and can't get along without him. Of course you're not, so stay strong and kick this guy to the curb and move on. There are Abuse Women's Service in your town and I suggest you seek them out for help. They will give you the tools to know your legal rights and to help you in anyway they can. Good luck Merry Christmas Marcy Stalkers and the Borderline Personality The Borderline Personality In recent years psychologists have learned about and done case studies on a new personality disorder which the DSM-III-R classifies as an Axis II disorder- the Borderline Personality . This classification includes such personality disorders as the Anti-social Personality, the Histrionic Personality and the Narcissistic Personality. Several psychologists (including myself) diagonosed my stalker as afflicted with the Borderline Personality. Characteristic of the Borderline (derived from research done by Kreisman & Straus, 1989) are: a shaky sense of identity sudden, violent outbursts oversensitivity to real or imagined rejection brief, turbulent love affairs frequent periods of intense depression eating disorders, drug abuse, and other self-destructive tendencies an irrational fear of abandonment and an inability to be alone Not much research has been done on the Borderline Personality, and for many years it was difficult to diagnose- and to treat. A Borderline often feels as though his/her life is marked with a distinctive emptiness; a void in which a relationship often acts to fill. Many times the Borderline is a victim of an early dysfunctional family situation and/or emotional/physical abuse by those he/she trusted early on in childhood. The Borderline is psychotic , in the original, psychological meaning of the term: he/she is not in control and not in touch with reality. To the Borderline, a softly spoken word of advice can be construed as a threat on his/her emotional stability. An outsider's viewpoint that the Borderline is not in touch with reality often ends in a bitter and irrational dissassociation from the outsider on the part of the Borderline. Often, the Borderline ends up very much alone and victim to his/her disillusions. The Borderline stalker is very apt to see his/her actions as perfectly justified; he/she has paranoid disillusions which support these-often with disturbing frequency. The Borderline often has brief love affairs which end abruptly, turbulently and leave the Borderline with enhanced feelings of self-hatred, self-doubt and a fear that is not often experienced by rational people. When the Borderline's relationships turn sour, the Borderline often begins to, at first, harass the estranged partner with unnecessary apologies and/or apologetic behavior (i.e. letters of apology 'from the heart', flowers delivered at one's place of employment, early morning weeping phonecalls, etc.). However, the Borderline does not construe his/her behavior as harassment- to the Borderline he/she is being 'responsible' for his/her past behaviors. The next phase of the Borderline Personality develops relatively quickly and soon he/she feels suddenly betrayed, hurt, etc. and seeks to victimize the estranged partner in any way he/she can Strangely enough, this deleterious behavior is always coupled with a need to be near or in constant contact with the estranged partner . While sending threats to the estranged partner, it is very common for the Borderline to begin to stalk his/her estranged partner in an effort to maintain contact. This effort is motivated by the excruciating fear that the Borderline will end up alone and anger that [the estranged partner] has put him/her in this position. We are finding, in many cases, that a great deal of stalking behavior is associated with Borderline or related personality disorders. Earlier research did not incorporate the Borderline Personality in stalking profiles; research now is beginning to focus on the Borderline in such disorders as Erotomania, etc.