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Answered 2013-03-21 12:10:35
Bankruptcy does not get discharged. Debts are discharged. The bankruptcy will remain on your credit report for 10 years from the date of filing. The debts that were discharged can remain for 7 years from the date of discharge, showing a zero balance and that they were discharged in bankruptcy.
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The bankruptcy will remain on the credit report until the required ten years has expired. UPDATE: Actually, you can force Equifax, Experian and TransUnion to remove a Bankruptcy from your credit report and you can do it legally using a federal law that is in place. Credit Bureaus MUST have "verifiable proof" of the "bankruptcy" in their files if they are going to report the negative item on your report. The dirty little secret the credit bureaus don't want you to know is that they do not have any "verifiable proof" in their files for any of the negative items on your credit report. The Federal Court that the bankruptcy was filed in may have this information on file but the credit bureaus don't. If you request the credit bureau to provide you with the "verifiable proof" that they have in their files they will remove the negative from your file.


Bankruptcy may remain on your credit report for up to ten years. However, what is probably more important to you is the impact that bankruptcy will have on your credit options. That depends heavily on how you handle your finances and credit accounts after bankruptcy. Many bankruptcy petitioners who manage their credit carefully and make an effort to rebuild credit are able to qualify for traditional mortgages and car loans within about two years.UPDATE: Actually, you can force Equifax, Experian and TransUnion to remove a Bankruptcy from your credit report and you can do it legally using a federal law that is in place. Credit Bureaus MUST have "verifiable proof" of the "bankruptcy" in their files if they are going to report the negative item on your report. The dirty little secret the credit bureaus don't want you to know is that they do not have any "verifiable proof" in their files for any of the negative items on your credit report. The Federal Court that the bankruptcy was filed in may have this information on file but the credit bureaus don't. If you request the credit bureau to provide you with the "verifiable proof" that they have in their files they will remove the negative from your file.


A bankruptcy stays on your credit report for 10 years and you may have to answer about it for the rest of your life. Who knows what effect it has on your credit score? Companies that lend money. Only when you apply for credit after bankruptcy will you know the full detrimental effect.


No. The repossession will be its own listing. If is was including in the bankruptcy, it will be listed as 'included in bankruptcy' but it will still be listed as its own listing.UPDATE: Actually, you can force Equifax, Experian and TransUnion to remove a Bankruptcy from your credit report and you can do it legally using a federal law that is in place. Credit Bureaus MUST have "verifiable proof" of the "bankruptcy" in their files if they are going to report the negative item on your report. The dirty little secret the credit bureaus don't want you to know is that they do not have any "verifiable proof" in their files for any of the negative items on your credit report. The Federal Court that the bankruptcy was filed in may have this information on file but the credit bureaus don't. If you request the credit bureau to provide you with the "verifiable proof" that they have in their files they will remove the negative from your file.Not only can you get a Bankruptcy Legally Removed from your credit report but you can also get Foreclosures, Default Judgments, Tax Liens, Repos, collections etc...all removed. All negatives no matter how bad, how many or how recent ... they all can be removed legally!


They use Experian. I know because I had a 2nd mtge discharged in a bankruptcy 3 years ago and this year they started doing hard inquiries on my credit report every 2 months. These frequent inquiries are not helping my FICO score but they claim they have the right to do it.


Unfortunately, filing for bankruptcy has a major negative effect on your credit, which as you probably already know can effect a lot of your future money issues. Bankruptcy, whether chapter 7 or chapter 13 stays on your credit report for at least 7-10 years after filing and just because it is off does not mean that your score will automatically increase-that is something you have to work for!


You will receive a letter that your bankruptcy is discharged. You can also call the bankruptcy court or the trustee and find out if it is final.


Bankruptcy looks worse on your credit report than a late payment. They will both drop your score quite a bit, but a bankruptcy lets your lenders know you gave up on the debts owed, so making it harder to get new loans. You can always try to contact the credit bureaus to try and dispute the negative listings and have them removed if possible.



Pull your credit report: www.annualcreditreport.com (free Equifax report)


Any account included in a bankruptcy remains on your personal credit report for a maximum of 7 years from the date the bankruptcy was filed. The bankruptcy itself, listed in the public record information section of a credit report, remains for either 7 years from the filing date if it was a Chapter 13, or 10 years from the filing date if it was a Chapter 7, 11 or 12. Source: ExperianMore Information:A bankruptcy can be removed from your credit report. I know two people who have done it.Basically how credit repair like this works is you, or attorneys you hire, challenge negative marks on your credit report. The Fair Credit Reporting Act - - gives you the right to dispute anything on your credit report. Once the credit reporting agency contacts the creditor to verify the account they have 30 days to respond with verification. If they do not respond the mark is removed. If they do respond you can challenge again and ask for real proof. I don't know the details of what is required but it can get to the point where they have to provide signed contracts, a list of all payments and bills, etc. What usually happens is the creditor does not respond and it is removed. The same is true of a bankruptcy, often the court does not get the information to the credit reporting agency so the bankruptcy is removed.That doesn't mean they can definitely remove a bankruptcy, or anything else. They may or may not. Obviously if the mark on your credit is not accurate it is a lot easier to have taken care of. I had credit issues caused by id theft that I was unable to do much about, but a credit repair agency quickly removed all the negative items and increased my score over 200 points. I know others who had legitimate bad marks, they seem to be able to get most of them removed but not all.Of course, this doesn't remove the actual bankruptcy, or any debts owed. It just removes them from your credit reports


You will know your chapter 13 bankruptcy is over once it is discharged. You will receive paperwork stating this either in person from your lawyer, or through the mail.


It is my understanding that it takes 7 years for a bankruptcy to cease to appear on a credit report. I do not know if this global, but this is the case in Canada. Your bank will know the answer to this for your region. ie; if you ask them for a credit card or loan - they will generally look up your credit history and then advise you when you should apply. In the US it's 10 years...and actually credit agencies may prepare information reports for subscribers that are for longer periods. The court record maintains much longer. But if it's over 10 years...ask the agency to update their report please.


A person or persons would need to file for bankruptcy before having any contact with the court and/or bankruptcy trustee. A bankruptcy discharge is what is granted if the filing is deemed valid.


The purpose of the Experian credit report is to find out your credit score as well as many other things. The Experian credit report is everything you need to know about your credit score.


Bankruptcy is the filing of a petition that claims your assets, and your inability to pay for them. Bankruptcy severely effects your credit, and is present on your credit for 7 years. During this time getting credit cards or loans can be very difficult.


I Have just been discharged from bankruptcy, does this legally mean that my possisions can not be touched and I am not liable anymore for the debt. I wont to know if my house is now safe ?


First, bluntly - your talking crazy - or maybe just ignorantly - which may be one of the reasons you went bankrupt. ALL HELOCS have a lien on the property, by definition. Period. End of story there. ALL YOUR DEBTS AND ALL YOUR ASSETS WERE SUBJECT TO THE ACTIONS OF THE BK COURT. Discharge (which as it is the best thing that can happen, I don't know why you would question - if it wasn't discharged, then you still owe it). Period end of of story. GET PERSONAL, INDIVIDUAL FINANCIAL AND LEGAL HELP...YOU'VE BEEN LUCKY BY WHAT YOU'VE SAID HERE...ONLY GOING BK (agreeably saying by doing so your a financial failure) AND HAVING THINGS FALL YOUR WAY, (dicharges of debts) INSPITE ANYWAY. And of course...basically any loan/debt (except Fed ins student loans), WITH a lien (as well as those WITHOUT one - like credit cards), may be discharged...and any bankruptcy court action is of public record and should correctly be reported on your credit report. It will remain there for 10 years.


The filing of a Chapter 13 SHOULD show on your credit report. The dismissal MAY show. Without seeing all three of your credit bureau files, there is no way to know for certain. You should obtain copies of all three reports from Equifax, Experian and Transunion. Dispute the appearance of anything having to do with a bankruptcy if you did not "go through with it".


The purpose of a free credit report is that the individual can get a report of their credit records. This way they can know what there standing is in terms of credit, and see if they have good credit or bad credit without paying any fees or services.


It is beneficial to obtain a credit report from all 3 credit bureaus because they may have discrepancies that you need to know about. Not many people know this but you can get an annual free credit report from the website annualcreditreport.com, and it really is free.


If you are on the brink of bankruptcy... you probably can't get a credit card. Opps... didn't read that right. Sorry. I really don't know.


It is not an issue of how long a bank can report a bankruptcy. Your real concern is how long that negative information follows you around on your credit report. That answer is 7 years. What generally happens around the end of the first year after filing is that lenders (banks) start mass-mailing credit applications to those who have filed bankruptcy. They know that you can not file again for what I believe is 7 years also, and generally those who have previously filed bankruptcy are more inclined to carry balances, which in turn generates greater revenue for the lender. I hope this helps Enjoy your day Dale


A hospital bill can stay on your credit report from 7-10 years. You can learn alot more by getting a credit report from Transunion, Experian or Equifax. You are entitled to one free credit report a year. You can go to annualcreditreport.com and get your free credit report their. It is very important to know what is on your credit report.


Yes I believe you can report credit card fraud if you know someone who has someone elses credit card, if let's say one of your friends or family member got there credit card stolen and you also know the person who stole the credit card you can report a credit card fraud or you can just let your friend or family member report fraud on there credit card, I hope this helps :).



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