How do you treat a snake bite?

If you're bitten by a venomous snake: DO stay calm.

DO call 911 and seek medical attention immediately.

DO remove any jewelry or tight clothing from the bitten area/limb right away (you'll want it off before the wound and surrounding tissue starts swelling).

Do NOT cut the bite site, or create any kind of tourniquet around the wound.

Do NOT put ice on the bite.

Do NOT try to suck the venom from the wound.

Do NOT treat the site with rubbing alcohol or medication.

Do NOT wait for swelling, pain or other common symptoms to manifest themselves before going to the emergency room.

1. Keep the person calm, reassuring them that bites can be effectively treated in an emergency room. Restrict movement, and keep the affected area below heart level to reduce the flow of venom pain.

2. If you have a pump suction device (such as that made by Sawyer), follow the manufacturer's directions.

3. Remove any rings or constricting items because the affected area may swell. Create a loose splint to help restrict movement of the area.

4. If the area of the bite begins to swell and change color, the snake was probably poisonous.

5. Monitor the person's vital signs -- temperature, pulse, rate of breathing, and blood pressure -- if possible. If there are signs of shock (such as paleness), lay the person flat, raise the feet about a foot, and cover the person with a blanket.

6. Get medical help right away.

7. Bring in the dead snake only if this can be done safely. Do not waste time hunting for the snake, and do not risk another bite if it is not easy to kill the snake. Be careful of the head when transporting it -- a snake can actually bite for up to an hour after it's dead (from a reflex).

8. Before anything try to poor tea on it, which contains Tannin that helps draw out liquid and tighten pores.

Do Not:

  • DO NOT allow the person to become over-exerted. If necessary, carry the person to safety.
  • DO NOT apply a tourniquet.
  • DO NOT apply cold compresses to a snake bite.
  • DO NOT cut into a snake bite with a knife or razor.
  • DO NOT try to suck out the venom by mouth.
  • DO NOT give the person stimulants or pain medications unless a doctor tells you to do so.
  • DO NOT give the person anything by mouth.
  • DO NOT raise the site of the bite above the level of the person's heart.

If you can quickly/immediately identify the snake do so. If the snake is nonpoisonous then clean the wound with soap and water and cover it to avoid infection. If the snake is poisonous then follow these steps.

1. Contact an ambulance or any other emergency hot line that can help. (your first option is to get the victim to a hospital)

2. If you cannot get to a hospital in time begin treating wound

3. Clean the wound to avoid infection. If using a wipe of some sort try not to rub the same place twice this can cause infection

4. Cover the wound with a clean dressing. This doesn't have to be too tight

5. Try to calm the victim while applying first aid, a slower heart rate can mean a slower reaction to venom as well as a slowed spread of the venom

6. Tie a cloth about six inches above the wound to restrict venom flow. You should be able to fit one finger under the cloth.

7. Keep the wound below the heart

8. Check the wound periodically for swelling

9. Apply splint if needed. (a splint is to stop or decrease movement of the injured area.)

Do not try to sucks venom out of the wound. This can greatly increase the chance of infection and will probably not accomplish much.

Poisonous Snakebites

These steps for treating poisonous snakebites assume that you have no special equipment such as a snakebite kit and do not have immediate access to medical services.[1]

  1. Get the victim away from the snake. Your first priority is to make sure that neither you nor the victim receive any additional snakebites.
  2. Remove clothing or constricting items. Bites from venomous snakes can cause rapid and severe swelling. Remove clothing or jewelry from the area.
  3. Minimize activity. Higher levels of activity will increase blood flow and increase the spread of poison through the body.
  4. Do not cut the bite site or use your mouth to suck out the poison. These are likely to be ineffective and can increase the likelihood of infection.
  5. Clean the bite site with soap and water. Cover the wound with a dressing.
  6. Wrap the bite site with a tight elastic bandage. You can use something like an Ace bandage for this, or can fashion one from a stretchy shirt or other article of clothing.

    • The intent of this step is to slow capillary and venous blood flow (flow back to the heart), but permit arterial blood flow (away from the heart).
    • Check for a pulse below the overwrap. It should be present.


Snake bites can be deadly if you don't react quickly as there are many different species of venomous snakes. First they you should do is get away from the snake to prevent additional bits. Call 911 to get medical assistance. Do not elevate - keep the bite below the heart level. Wash the bite with warm soapy water. Remove constricting clothing and or jewelry to allow for swelling. Follow the basic first aid to prevent the person to go into shock while awaiting medical care.

Cutting or sucking out the posion will not help will only create more problems - infections. If possible bring the snake with you so the appropriate medications can be provided. If it is not, a picture would help, as now a days everyone has a cell phone in their pocket.

Firstly, snakes aren't Poisinous, they're Venomous - Venom is just protein - one could take a glass of venom and, provided he / she has no cavities in their teeth and no ulsers in their mouth or stomach, they could drink it with no consequenses!

If someone is bitten, don't try and catch the snake, you might be bitten as well! Call Emergency Services. Remove constricting clothing and jewelry from the extremity. The area may swell and constricting items will cause tissue death., (often the snake will deliver a Dry Bite - no injection of venom). Wash the bite site with warm soap and water.

There are three main classes of snake venom: -

1. Myo-cytotoxic, (Puff Adder, Gaboon Viper, Horned Adder, Pit Viper) - these snakes have hinged fanges and their venom causes massive swelling and tissue damage.

2. Neurotoxic, (Cobras, Mambas, Berg Adder, Sea Snake, Rinkhals) - These snakes are front fanged and cause respiratory and cardiac arrest.

3. Haemotoxic - (Boomslang, Vine Snake) - these snakes are back fanged and their venom disolves the plateletes in their victim's blood causing massive haemoraging.

Snakes have recently began to interbreed which cases many different types of venom. This creates a problem for doctors for choosing the correct anti-venom - So a doctor would nowdays, if the type of snake is not known, treat the patient symptomatically.

If a first aid kit is available, grab the bandage that is used for sports injuries - the Crape Bandage. Wrap the extremity from Distal to Proximal and make sure there is a Distal Pulse - this will tell you if the dressing is too tight or not. The reason for this treatment is to try and spread the venom around the entire limb - {the body will allways flush an injury site with fluid, by spreading the venom the body flushes the entire limb with fluid and therefore Diluting the venom and giving you more time to get the patient to Medical assistance}.


Treating snake bites

Keep the victim calm, move them away from the snake and do not try to kill the snake.

Minimize the victims activity level; this will slow down the spread of the venom through the bloodstream.

Immediately remove any jewelry, such as rings, bracelets or watches, due to possible swelling.

Seek medical attention as soon as possible by dialing 9-1-1, or transporting the victim to the nearest medical facility. Getting immediate medical help for the victim is crucial.

If possible apply snake bite first aid if you can not get the person immediate medical attention. Keep the bite wound below the level of the heart.

Clean the bite with soap and water and apply a clean, dry dressing.

It's important to know which type of snake has bitten the victim. So pay close attention to the color and shape of the snake so that you can inform the medical personal.

Snake Bite First Aid - Things You Should Not Do

Do not try to pick up the snake or trap it. This could put you at risk for a bite.

Do not slash the bite wound with a knife.

Do not apply a tight bandage or tourniquet.

Do not suck out the venom (this can be dangerous to you and the bacteria in your mouth can infect the wound.

Do not immerse the wound in water or apply ice.

Do not drink alcohol as a pain reliever.

Do not drink coffee or other caffeinated beverages.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND A VIDEO GO TO:http://www.emergencysuppliesinfo.com/snake-bite-first-aid.html
While waiting for emergency help to arrive, the victim should wash the wound site with soap and water, and then keep the injured area still and at a level lower than the heart. Ice should never be used on the wound site.
Get to a hospital/doctor asap but in the very likely-hood that a doctor is less than 30 minutes away you can suck the poison out. The wisest way to do this is to swill your mouth with oil (olive vegetable whatever's on hand) or a similar substance that will effectively coat your mouth so you don't get the venom in your own blood stream. After coating mouth suck poison out, spit it out then thoroughly rinse your mouth with water. BUT do not eat/drink anything until you see a medical professional!! The medical professional can take it from there as you have removed the immediate danger...

Oh the joys of first aid
Antivenom for that type of snake, they normally have some at hospital or zoo.

EDIT: The first contributor assumes the bite is from a venomous snake - giving anti-venin to someone who hasn't been bitten by a venomous snake will do more harm than good ! Treatment for any snake bite - If at all possible - identify the snake ! Sit (do not lie) the patient down. Immobilize the limb and apply a pressure bandage to the area of the bite. Seek medical advice as soon as possible.
use a belt or a piece of cloth and wrap it an inch to where you got the bite, to prevent it from spreading, do not apply ice or any of these urban 'first aids', call an ambulance or a doctor.
Answer:

If you are bitten by a venomous snake it is better to go to the hospital so they can give you anti venom.

If you are bitten by a non-venomous snake, clean the wound really good since they can carry bacteria.

Answer:

Unless you are absolutely sure the snake is known to be non-venomous ,go to the hospital. better be safe than sorry. If possible take a photo of the snake for a positive ID. Remember Time is tissue
If you don't know what kind of snake it was, kill or safely capture it for identification purposes. Call emergency services an ambulance. Seek proper medical attention. Place some ice in a bag and put it on the area you were bitten. Do not try to suck the poison out. That doesn't work.

In the USA, if you know it was a non-venomous snake, such as a racer, or garter, corn, milk, bull, king, indigo or pine snake, or a coachwhip, then wash the bite wound thoroughly with soap and water, scrubbing it well. Apply an antiseptic ointment, and bandage the wound. Apply an icebag to keep down any swelling or inflammation, and monitor the site. IF it starts to swell a lot, get very hot and reddened, or if streaks start appearing out of the immediate area, go to your doctor or an emergency clinic right away. The wound could be infected.
Answer:

If you are bitten by a venomous snake it is better to go to the hospital so they can give you anti venom.

If you are bitten by a non-venomous snake, clean the wound really good since they can carry bacteria.

Answer:

Unless you are absolutely sure the snake is known to be non-venomous ,go to the hospital. better be safe than sorry. If possible take a photo of the snake for a positive ID. Remember Time is tissue



If you're bitten by a venomous snake:


DO stay calm.


DO call 911 and seek medical attention immediately.


DO remove any jewelry or tight clothing from the bitten area/limb right

away (you'll want it off before the wound and surrounding tissue starts

swelling).


Do NOT cut the bite site, or create any kind of tourniquet around the wound.


Do NOT put ice on the bite.


Do NOT try to suck the venom from the wound.


Do NOT treat the site with rubbing alcohol or medication.


Do NOT wait for swelling, pain or other common symptoms to manifest

themselves before going to the emergency room.