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2015-01-20 15:12:31
2015-01-20 15:12:31

A candidate receives electoral votes in any given state by being voted for by the voters

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If no president candidate receive a majority of electoral votes, the president is elected by the House of Representatives. Each state is allowed one vote.


McCain will receive all 34 Electoral College Votes. Texas is a winner take all State.


No. Each state has so many electoral college votes based on population. So the winning candidate of state will receive X amount of electoral votes.


A candidate needs 270 electoral votes to win the presidency. However, if neither candidate reaches this threshold, the election is thrown to the House of Representatives and they vote (1 vote per state) to decide who becomes president.


The numbers are the amount of votes a state has in the electoral college. A candidate must receive more than half of electoral votes in order to become president. In 2012, this means they must receive 270 electoral votes in order to become president.


Electoral votes in the US are the popular vote for each state combined into an electoral. Example - 50,000 people vote for a candidate in one state. 60,000 vote for the other candidate in the same state. The candidate with 60,000 voted in that states gets the electoral vote. Note. A state can have more electoral votes depending on population.


The winner take all system means that all of electoral votes from a state go to the candidate who receives the majority of votes. It also means that electoral votes are not proportionally distributed, meaning that if a candidate gets 51% of citizens votes they receive 100% of the electoral votes.


By majority, if the candidate has most of Iowa's electoral votes lets say 21-20 then that candidate that had 21 got all the 41 electoral votes for that state.


People vote for a candidate. Each state has a given number of electoral votes. Win the state, get the votes from that state. Get more votes than your opponent, and you have been elected.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


A candidate has to receive 270 electoral votes in order to become President of the United States. California is the state with the most electoral votes.


Since the 2008 Democratic Presidential candidate, Barack Obama, is from Illinois, his state has 21 electoral votes.


each presidential candidate would receive the same share of a state's electoral vote as he or she received in the state popular vote


The electors meet in the state capital and vote. The secretary of state certifies their ballots and sends them to the president of the US senate.


When no candidate gets a majority of the electoral college vote in a presidential election, it goes to the House of Representatives. In this "sudden death runoff", each state gets one vote.This could only happen if a third-party candidate were to receive some electoral college votes, or if a "faithless elector" were to decline to vote for their pledged candidate.


The electoral college is based on the population of a state. If a majority of the state votes for a certain Candidate then the state wins all the Electoral votes which is all the Senates and Representatives.


The amount of electoral votes a candidate will get in Virginia is decided by a primary ballot. Virginia is not a caucus state.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


If no candidate receives a majority of electoral votes, the Twelfth Amendment of the United State Constitution provides that the U.S. House of Representatives will select the president, with each of the fifty state delegations casting one vote, and the U.S. Senate will select the vice-president.


In each state (except Maine and Nebraska), the winner of that state takes all of that state's electoral votes. For example, Ohio has 18 Electoral Votes. If the Republican candidate would win a mere 51% of all the people's votes, then all 18 of the state's electoral votes would be given to the Republican candidate. This can result in a President being elected who did not actually receive as many votes as another candidate. It is theoretically possible for the a candidate to win by just one vote in the 11 largest states and get no votes at all in the other 39 states and DC and still win the election.


Each state gets there own set number of electoral votes. If a candidate wins in that state, they get the electoral votes of that state.


the candidate who receives the most popular votes in a state is credited with all that states electoral votes



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