Custody
Family
Divorce

How does joint custody affect children?

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2015-07-19 15:25:19
2015-07-19 15:25:19

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The critical factor appears to be conflict between parents. With relatively little conflict between parents, joint custody is associated with better outcomes for children.

Joint custody is not all as pleasant as it seems. Some kids don't really care, but for kids like me who are use to being around both of my parents it is really hard to deal with. I am 17 and my parents got a divorce about 2 years ago. Since then I hardly ever see my dad even though my parents have joint custody. If my mom gets mad at my dad then she won't let us (my little sister, little brother,and me) go and spend time with him. She says that she only does it because she wants to make sure that he doesn't try to hurt us in any way, but I don't think that is the case. This also goes the same for my dad. If he gets mad at my mom he won't spend time with us he will just make up excuses. He does it to try and hurt my moms feelings but he is really hurting us. Going from one house to another is not fun either. Because you have to let your friends or any one wants to see you who house your staying at and that is a pain in the butt. So all these experts think they know every thing but they don't because half of them have never been in a situation like us kids have to go through.

It is easy to find research supporting both sides of this question. Joint custody (50/50) sounds great in theory but is difficult and often harmful to the child. Living in two different places makes it difficult for the child to find the stability they need. Where do they call home? It also takes two parents working together 100% of the time to establish consistent rules, moral values, and even things as simple as bedtimes. True joint custody may be appropriate in those cases where the parents stay good friends and divorce on good terms. In my case, my wife left the kids and I for a much younger lifestyle that is not kid friendly. I am so thankful I was awarded primary physical custody. Joint custody would not be in the best interest of the kids. I find it hard enough to deal with my ex-wife allowing our 4 and 8 year old stay up past midnight, watching R-rated movies with them, and trying to be more of a cool friend than a mom. It would be so much worse if custody was on a 50/50 basis.

Joint custody is the ideal when it is amicable. If all parents would behave in the way a responsible adult should, it would be a much happier and peaceful environment for children who have no choice in the matter.

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2015-07-18 15:58:13
2015-07-18 15:58:13

There is no single answer to your question since there are many variations of joint custody and other factors that must be considered. Joint custody can mean joint legal custody and/or joint physical custody. It can mean the children live at one parent's home or move between both. It affects children differently depending on the child and the behavior of the adults. Joint custody can help to mitigate the impact of divorce on children or it can exacerbate it. To be at all successful the parents must have a congenial relationship and be dedicated to doing what's best for the children.

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Related Questions


There are three types of joint custody.Joint Legal Custody Similar to sole custody, whereby one parent still retains primary residential custody and control of the children.Joint Physical Custody Otherwise referred to as Split Custody, each parent has residential custody and control of the children 50% of the time.Bird Nest Custody The children remain in the family home and each parent resides there for a designated period of time, then switch.

Joint custody with both ex-wives.

No. Married parents have equal rights where their children are concerned. Legal joint custody means you have an equal right to make decisions that affect the children. If the two of you cannot agree then a court will need to break the impasse.No. Married parents have equal rights where their children are concerned. Legal joint custody means you have an equal right to make decisions that affect the children. If the two of you cannot agree then a court will need to break the impasse.No. Married parents have equal rights where their children are concerned. Legal joint custody means you have an equal right to make decisions that affect the children. If the two of you cannot agree then a court will need to break the impasse.No. Married parents have equal rights where their children are concerned. Legal joint custody means you have an equal right to make decisions that affect the children. If the two of you cannot agree then a court will need to break the impasse.

when joint custody is in place both parents have the same rights. unless stipulated in court records. Joint means both so when ever the other parent is suppose to have visitation with the child the child / children must go. review documents that grant Joint custody.

Yes, if you have joint legal custody.Yes, if you have joint legal custody.Yes, if you have joint legal custody.Yes, if you have joint legal custody.

As the father has joint legal custody of the child he can not say he does not want the child at the paramour.

Parents who don't live together have joint custody (also called shared custody) when they share the decision-making responsibilities for, and/or physical control and custody of, their children. Joint custody can exist if the parents are divorced, separated, or no longer cohabiting, or even if they never lived together.

joint custody means both parents have custody of the children and all decisions concerning the children have to be a joint decision... including trips out of the state. I have not heard of access... I am thinkgin access is giving the non custodail parent visitation rights. Research the Laws for your state.

Joint custody is a form of legal custody. Sole Custody: One parent has full custody and control while the other may have minimum limited access. Joint Legal Custody: Similar to Sole Custody, but with a little more access right, as well as the right to be consulted in matters regarding the child, but as a working model, really has little difference. Joint Physical Custody: The parents are the children equally in all matters, including decision making. Bird Nest Custody: Similar to Joint Physical, except the children remain in the home and each parent lives there for a designated period of time, than switch.

my friend lives in new jersey if she has custody of her children can she move out of state and give her children a good life.

If you have joint legal custody yes you do have the right to help choose who cares for your children. The parents should discuss the issue reasonably and try to agree.If you have joint legal custody yes you do have the right to help choose who cares for your children. The parents should discuss the issue reasonably and try to agree.If you have joint legal custody yes you do have the right to help choose who cares for your children. The parents should discuss the issue reasonably and try to agree.If you have joint legal custody yes you do have the right to help choose who cares for your children. The parents should discuss the issue reasonably and try to agree.

When it pertains to custodial issues related to minor children all US states have laws that allow for sole and joint custody by the biological parents.

Your husband cannot get joint custody of your children from a prior marriage. Custody arrangements are made between parents of children. Your present husband can legally adopt your children with their father's consent. He would then have all the legal rights and obligations of a biological father. The children would become his legal heirs-at-law.

Child support is determined according to state guidelines and physical custody is one of the factors used to determine the amount.

no you can move out of state if you have joint custody.

If there is a divorce with two children and joint physical custody has been ordered by the court, does each parent have a right to claim one child per year? This generally has to be addressed by the court, but joint physical custody does not necessarily mean equal physical access. He parent with the children 51% of the time can take the deduction, minus any time spent in day care and/or school. A true form of joint physical custody is Bird Nest. see link below

Not if the other parent has joint custody and/or visitation rights.

By petitioning the court to give joint custody to the parents. In most state, Joint Legal Custody is the standard. If you mean Joint Physical Custody, with 50/50 Custody, this is more complicated, requiring preparation similar to petitioning for full custody.

She would have to petition the court to be appointed the temporary guardian. If the biological mother has joint custody or is available to take the children the custody will automatically go to her unless she has already been deemed unfit or consents to the guardianship.

Primary custody is generally defined as belonging to the parent with whom the child or children reside with the majority of the time. It does not mean that it cannot be a joint custody arrangement as well.

Any legally married couple has the same rights if they obtain a divorce. The issue of joint custody of the children would be decided by the court depending on certain factors that include the laws in the particular jurisdictions. Some favor automatic joint custody, others evaluate the relationship between the parties to try to determine if they can get along well enough to make joint custody work to the benefit of the children. You should consult with an attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation and explain your options.

Joint custody is two parents sharing physical and or legal custody of minor children.Guardianship is when a person who is not the legal parenthas physical and legal custody of the minor. However, a guardian can be appointed for a person of any age who cannot manage their own affairs.

Yes, if she has sole legal custody. Not necessarily, if you have joint legal custody. Definitely not, if you have sole legal custody.


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