Christmas
Australia

How is Christmas celebrated in Australia?

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2016-12-21 09:59:10

Christmas in Australia(from various

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  • Mixed grill on the barby (barbeque) is a popular Christmas

    meal.

  • Lots of family, lots of presents , good food and a lot of times

    a barby on the beach. Australians who celebrate Christmas do so by

    getting together with friends and family and partaking in the foods

    that they traditionally reserved for this time of the year. The

    traditional Christmas also put an extra onus on people to try to be

    a little more tolerant and forgiving with each other and to show

    charity to those less fortunate. Homes and yards are decorated with

    various motives some in the religious vein while others concentrate

    more on the Santa Claus side of thing enjoyed by the children.

  • Some celebrate with the traditional hot Christmas dinner

    familiar to those in England, but many have cold meats and salads.

    Christmas Day comes in the summer and temperatures can be high.

    Many attend Christmas Eve or Morning church services. Increasingly,

    towns and suburbs are lit with coloured lights, and people vie with

    each other to have the biggest or most spectacular display. Touring

    the Christmas lights displays is becoming an increasingly popular

    evening activity just before Christmas.

  • Christmas is the most looked forward to holiday of the year.

    Christmas is celebrated with family and is a time for exchanging

    gifts with loved ones. As Christmas occurs in the summer, it is

    common to celebrate with a family dinner or lunch of cold food or a

    barbecue and, for some people, lots of alcohol. Non-alcoholic

    drinks are also available. It is also traditional to decorate a

    Christmas tree for the occasion, and for 'Santa' or 'Father

    Christmas' to visit and deliver gifts to young children at

    midnight. Traditions of Christmas also involve carols by candle

    light, and midnight masses.

  • A lot of people in Australia are Christians, so many of them

    attend Christmas Eve services (in some denominations) and/or

    Christmas Day services. "Carols by Candlelight" services are held

    at churches and in communities all around the country in the

    lead-up to Christmas.

  • The Christian background is the historic origin of the

    Christmas celebration. Many people still have strong religious

    convictions and many that don't still have a place in their heart

    for the principles put forward by Jesus Christ in relation to the

    love and peace that most of us would like to see among each other.

    However, these days a lot of pressure is put on parents, relatives

    and friends alike to bring this festival into a very materialistic

    realm, Why in the USA they are actually afraid to call it Christmas

    and there is talk that the Christmas may be renamed Jesus

    holiday.

  • Christmas Day can end up being extremely hot in Australia. In

    the north, it is the beginning of the cyclone season (Cyclone Tracy

    destroyed Darwin on Christmas Day 1974). Outdoor entertaining is

    very popular, and many families celebrate Christmas on beaches, in

    parks, or outdoors at home. Many still lay on the full traditional

    hot dinner, but it is equally likely that cold meats and salads

    will be on the menu.

  • Paradoxically, the decorations, cards and related paraphernalia

    all reflect a northern hemisphere theme. Icicles, snow, 'Jingle

    Bells', and 'I'm Dreaming of a White Christmas 'still hold sway in

    stores and homes. After all, 'I'm Dreaming of a Brown Christmas'

    would be more accurate, but just doesn't put you in the same

    festive mood! Sure, there are Australian Christmas songs, but they

    are well and truly in the background, although coming to increasing

    prominence.

  • Australians that celebrate Christmas do so by getting together

    with friends and family and partaking in the foods that they

    traditionally reserved for this time of the year. the traditional

    Christmas also put an extra onus on people to try to be a Little

    more tolerant and forgiving with each other and to show charity to

    those less fortunate. homes and yards are decorated with various

    motives some in the religious vein while others concentrate more on

    the Santa clause side of thing enjoyed by the children. pine trees

    are brought inside and decorated with ornaments and lights. and on

    the night before Christmas day when the Little children are asleep

    gifts for them and others in the family are placed under the tree

    to be opened on Christ mass morning.

  • Each and every Australian celebrates Christmas differently like

    any other country. For example, the members of one family may get

    up, open presents and then go to see the family and just spend time

    together the whole day. But every person is different - instead of

    having fun in the snow some may go to the beach or go in the

    pool.

  • Christmas in Australia is very warm, so typical activities

    include playing cricket or other outdoor sports, visiting the

    beach, barbequeuing, etc., in addition to Christmas traditions such

    as exchanging gifts, eating and drinking, spending time with family

    and going to church.

  • Outdoors displays of nativity scenes, besides having the

    traditional figures, often feature Australian native animals,

    particularly kangaroos and koalas. Similarly, Christmas plays often

    follow a uniquely Australian storyline involving the "babe in the

    bush".

  • The same as people do elsewhere, except that in Australia it's

    Summertime in December, so many people have their Christmas dinner

    out of doors or take it down to the beach! But they still mark it

    just as people do in the Northern hemisphere, with decorations,

    carols, Christmas trees, cards, presents and so on. This may sound

    strange to a Northern hemisphere person, but it's worth remembering

    that the true month of Christ's birth was in June, not December, so

    the weather in Australia in December is actually closer to what it

    would have really been like in the Middle East when Jesus was born.

    The date was moved to December by Pope Julius I in the 4th Century,

    because he thought that it was too close to the Pagan festival of

    the Summer Solstice and wanted to distance the celebration from

    Christianity as much as possible.

  • Christmas celebrations in Australia take on a variety of forms.

    Some of the traditional customs from England remain, and Christmas

    trees, Christmas carols, and fancy Christmas dinners are all very

    popular. "Carols by Candlelight" services are held at churches and

    in communities all around the country in the lead-up to Christmas,

    and of course there are choirs singing carols in shopping

    centres.

  • Due to the fact that Christmas falls during summer and so many

    parts of Australia can be very hot during Christmas, Australians

    often seek alternatives to hot Christmas dinners. Barbequed meats

    are very popular, along with cold salads and cold desserts. Turkey,

    ham and fresh prawns top the list for Christmas dinners. Outdoor

    entertaining is very popular, and many families celebrate Christmas

    on beaches, in parks, or outdoors at home. Many attend Christmas

    Eve or Morning church services. Increasingly, towns and suburbs are

    lit with coloured lights, and people vie with each other to have

    the biggest or most spectacular display. Touring the Christmas

    lights displays is becoming an increasingly popular evening

    activity just before Christmas. Gift-giving is high on the list. It

    is something of an anachronism to see Father Christmas aka Santa

    Claus in his thick, red suit in shopping centres when it can be

    sweltering hot outside. Some families open their gifts on Christmas

    Eve; most open them in the morning. Outdoors displays of nativity

    scenes, besides having the traditional figures, often feature

    Australian native animals, particularly kangaroos and koalas.

    Similarly, Christmas plays often follow a uniquely Australian

    storyline involving the "babe in the bush".


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