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How long is a landlord able to sue you for damages after you have vacated the apartment?

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2005-11-14 06:54:25
2005-11-14 06:54:25

The amount of time a landlord has to sue for damages will vary by state and the type of California. In California, for example, you have 4 years to make a claim on a written contract, and 3 years to file for property damage. A claim for unpaid rent on a written rental agreement is 4 years. Property damage might be 3 years from the date you moved out. The laws of your state may be different.

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