How many animals a year die from animal testing?

  • In the 2004 (U.S) 1,101,958 animals were tested on. That's just including dogs, cats, primates, guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits and farm animals. This does not include the millions of mice and rats tested on each year, because the government does consider mice and rats "real" animals and therefore experimenters don't keep track of how many they test.
  • Another fact is that in 1990-1997 research labs registered with the USDA reported killing at least 12,895,885 dogs, cats, primates, guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits, bears, armadillos, squirrels, wild rodents and other species. this doesn't include non USDA registered labs.
  • From the facts above, millions of animals die from animal testing each year world wide. The official numbers only count for the registered deaths, but in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs) where there is corruption, the numbers may be much higher or lower than what they are. Therefore it is uncertain the exact number of animals that die. On average, possibly millions.

Animals die each year from testing

  • Recent (fiscal 2005) United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) statistics list a total of 1,177,566 (a one-year increase of 7%) primates, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, and other species as being subjected to experimental procedures. The species by species listings include:
66,610 dogs

57,531 primates

58,598 pigs

245,786 rabbits

22,921 cats

176,988 hamsters

64,146 other farm animals

32,260 sheep

231,440 other animals

221,286 guinea pigs

However, this total is likely far from accurate. At no time have all laboratories in the U.S. reported their experimental totals. The total of non-reporting facilities has varied from 22 to 128 (out of approximately 1100). The species that are not covered by the Animal Welfare Act (rats, mice, etc.) are not even counted. Therefore, the total above ignores the majority of animals experimented upon in the U.S. The real number of animals experimented on in the U.S. each year is well over 20 million. Additionally, these statistics do not cover animals that are caged in laboratories but are being held for conditioning or breeding. For example, while the USDA reports the use of over 57,000 primates in labs, the actual total is probably more like 120,000.
We do not know the exact number, however it is estimated that roughly 10 million animals die each year from animal testing in the United States. Stated differently, every minute, 219 animals needlessly die in a US lab.

  • In the US in 2004 1,101,958 animals were tested on. That's just including dogs, cats, primates, guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits and farm animals. This does not include the millions of mice and rats tested on each year, because the government does consider mice and rats "real" animals and therefore experimenters don't keep track of how many they test.
  • Another fact is that in 1990-1997 research labs registered with the USDA reported killing at least 12,895,885 dogs, cats, primates, guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits, bears, armadillos, squirrels, wild rodents and other species. this doesn't include non USDA registered labs.
  • The official numbers only count for the registered deaths, but in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs) where there is corruption, the numbers may be much higher or lower than what they are. Therefore it is uncertain the exact number of animals that die. On average, possibly millions.

too many!!! :(
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About 100 million (100,000,000) are tested on each year. About 70 million (70,000,000) die from it, and many of the 30 million (30,000,000) surviving are reused for a different. But the FDA does not even require animal testing on products, but most companies still do it even though there are many alternatives possible that work even better!
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Most of the time these animals are rodents. It is vary sad that we have to experiment on animals. We need to be thankful that the animals can provide us with the medicine.

In 2004,(U.S. only) 1,101, 958 animals were tested on, not including the millions of mice and rats tested on each year.

In 2005, the USDA list a total of 1,777,566 animals were tested, again, not including mice and rats. This was a 7 percent increase from the previous year.