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Elements and Compounds
Atoms and Atomic Structure

How many electrons will Al have in its valence shell?

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Answered
2012-03-14 00:54:56
2012-03-14 00:54:56

3 electrons

2 in the first ring

8 in the second ring

And 3 in the valence

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2020-09-21 10:56:29
2020-09-21 10:56:29

3

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Related Questions


Aluminium (Al) has three valence electrons.



Al is aluminum and its number 13 well it has 13 electrons the reason why they put +3 is that u lose 3 electrons to make a full valence shell and if its negative 2 for example the number would be number 8 and add 2 more electrons which makes it a full valence shell


each group has the same number of valence electrons i.e. group 1 elements have 1 valence electron, group 2 elements have 2 outer shell electrons, group 3 elements have 3 valence shell electrons etc. so in group 3 - B, Al, Ga, In, Tl all have 3 valence electrons


H, Li, Na, K = 1valence electrons Be, Mg, Ca = 2 valence electrons B, Al = 3 valence electrons C, Si = 4 valence electrons N, P = 5 valence electrons O, S = 6 valence electrons F, Cl = 7 valence electrons He, Ne. Ar = 0 because they are noble gases and all their electron shells are full


Aluminum wants to lose three electrons. The atomic number of Al is 13, thus an uncharged Al has 13 electrons: 2 in the first shell, 8 in the second and 3 in the last shell. Since the element has 3 valence electrons it will try to lose them. As a result, it will have a charge of +3


Al -3 gains 3 electrons so Al has 13 electrons..the configuration is: 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^2 3p^1


Al2+ has 13 protonsAl itself has 13 electrons and 13 protons, 2+ means that Al has ''lost'' 2 electrons(and now have 11 electrons), the number of protons stays the same(13)Added:By the way, it is more common to take Al3+ as example, because Al has 3 valence electrons (in its outer shell) to donate to eg. oxygen: Al2O3 is formed.



Well, look at the group(vertical) on a periodic table and you'll find group 3A. The group number tells how many valence electrons not how many electrons in an element. So Boron(B) Aluminum(Al) Gallium(Ga) Indium(In) Thallium(Tl) will all have 3 valence electrons. The atomic # tells the total # of electrons in an element.


Mg (with 2 valence electrons) is more reactive than Al (with 3 valence electrons) In the reactivity series magnesium come just above aluminium


Well, if you're asking about valence electrons, there are 3. Otherwise, there are a total of 13 electrons in a neutral Aluminum atom Electron Configuration [Al]: 2 - 8 - 3


Three, as expected from its location in column 13 in a modern periodic table.


The atomic number of Al is 13. So it has 13 protons and 13 electrons (total). The electronic configuration of Al is 2, 8, 3. So there are 3 valence electrons. The number of neutrons depends on the isotope used. Al-27 is the most stable isotope of Aluminium and it has 14 neutrons (27 - 13 = 14).


Fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, and astatine have 7 valence electrons.


Number of valence electrons depends on number of electrons in uncharged atom(= atomic number), not on mass number. Al has atomic number = 13 and it belongs to group 13( III A) of periodic table so it's uncharged atom has 3 valence electrons. But valence electrons in ions is different. No. of valence electrons in an ion = No. of valence electrons in uncharged atom + negative charge or - positive charge1. 1. for charges only their magnitude is taken i.e. if charge is +2 or -2 then 2 is taken and put in equation.


Someone else answered this with :O=O-Al-Al=O:, but since 26 electrons are available, and Al doesn't have full octets, i think it's wrong. Or, just possibly, I am. There are 24 valence electrons available. The stable oxygen ion will move to the electron configuration of the noble gas neon to gain 2- electrons. While Aluminum loss or transfer its 3+ valence electrons to also become the noble gas neon. The Octets Rule is now is play for the 24 valence electrons. :Ö =O=Al=Al=Ö:


The number of valence electrons is just how many electrons an atom has in its outer shell. It's easy to figure out if you've got a periodic table.(See the link below this answer for a good periodic table).All the elements in each column have the same number of electrons in their outer shells. All the elements in the first column all have a single valence electron (H, Li, Na, K, etc.).The second column elements all have 2 valence electrons (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, etc.).Skipping over the gap, go to the Group 3 elements, which all have 3 valence electrons (B, Al, Ga, etc.).The elements in the next column (C, Si, Ge, etc.) all have 4 valence electrons.The elements in the next column (N, P, As, etc.) all have, yes, you guessed it, 5 valence electrons.O, S, Se, and the others in this column have 6 valence electrons.The halogens in the next-to-last column (F, Cl, Br, etc.) have 7 valence electrons.The noble gases in the right-most column (Ne, Ar, Kr, etc.) all have 8 electrons in their out except for He, which only has 2 electrons.In column 1 all of those elements have 1 valence electron.In column 2 there are 2 valence electrons. He(Helium) is included here.Skip columns 3 to 12 because their valence electrons vary.Column 13 has 3 valence electrons.Column 14 has 4 valence electrons.Column 15 has 5 valence electrons.Column 16 has 6 valence electrons.Column 17 has 7 valence electrons.Column 18,except for He(Helium), has 8 valence electrons.


aluminum is a metal with atomic no. 13 in the periodic table of elements. . Its symbol is Al. It has 3 electrons in it valence shell and can be found in the 3rd period and 3rd group of the modern periodic table.





The electron configuration for Al is [Ne] 3s2 3p1, so there are 3 valence electrons in the 3rd energy level (2 in the s and 1 in the p orbital). This gives aluminum an oxidation state of 3+


all the members of 3rd A group of periodic table have 3 electrons in outermost shell they are B ,Al, Ga, Tl and In.


Zeff = (# of protons) - (# of core electrons) Zeff of Al = 13 - 10 = +3 The effective nuclear charge experienced by Aluminum's valence electrons is +3



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