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How many moles of Fe are present in 30 grams in rust?


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Answered 2016-08-13 16:36:08

This amount may be different because rust is not a clearly definite compound.

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Answered 2016-08-17 10:41:23

In the most common form of rust, Fe2O3, you would have 30 g x 1mol/160 g = 0.1875 moles
0.1875 moles Fe2O3 x 2 moles Fe/mole Fe2O3 = 0.375 moles of Fe.

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This depends on the exact composition of this rust.





The present tense is:I/You/We/They rust.He/She/It rusts.The present participle is rusting.The past tense is rusted.The past participle is rusted.


Rust is Iron oxide. It contains Iron and Oxygen.


Yes an no. There has to be humidity in the air. So yes in the form of vapors.Iron can rust whenever oxygen is present.


All rust is is Oxidation. When Oxygen is added to something it's Oxidation... Phosphates can prevent rust.


Rust has a chemical formula of Fe2O3. Ferric oxide has a molar mass of 159.69 grams per mol and a density of 5.26 grams per cubic centimeter.


In order for metal to rust, both oxygen and water must be present. :)


Assuming "rust" to be Fe2O3 rather than a lesser predictable mix of various compounds... 2 moles Fe per 1 mole rust = 2.4/2 = 1.2mols rust. 3 moles O per 1 mole rust = 1.2 x 3 = 3.6 mols O. However...it may be noted that oxygen naturally exists as a diatomic molecule and so it should be explicitly stated whether the amount of monatomic or diatomic oxygen is wanted. 3.6 mols O ...or... 1.8 mols O2


Taking rust to be Fe2O3, you would have the following reaction:Fe2O3 + 6HCl ==> 2FeCl3 + 3H2O100 g Fe2O3 x 1 mole Fe2O3/159.7 g = 0.626 moles Fe2O3moles HCl needed = 0.626 moles Fe2O3 x 6 moles HCl/mole Fe2O3 = 3.76 moles HCl neededMass HCl needed = 3.76 moles HCl x 36.5 g/mole = 137 g HCl needed


Fe=Iron (112 grams) O=Oxygen (48 grams) This is actually Iron Oxide, or Rust!


Saltwater has many salts of Calcium,Magnesium etc. which are not present in freshwater. These salts react with Iron rapidly and make it rust whereas this doesn't happen in freshwater.


Vinegar does not make iron rust. Oxygen makes iron rust. Vinegar provides an electrolyte that facilitates electron transfer that allows iron rust faster than it would if it were not present.


ferrous metal, air & moisture


Some weathered rocks have rust streaks due to the iron content in the rocks. When rocks that have ferrous iron are weathered there will be rust streaks present.


Wrought iron contains iron and carbon. The iron with oxygen present in the environment and forms iron oxide which is rust.


The Ford F150 was produced from the years 1948 to present. The rust is bad on the undercarriage of a Ford F150 if the rust can be seen falling off of the vehicle.


Both water and oxygen are needed for rusting to occur.Iron and steel rust when they come into contact with water and oxygen. Both are present in the air.


No. as rust is caused by the oxidation process of: O2+2H2O+4e = 4OH in sodium hydroxide the hydroxide is already present making it harder to form and therefore making rust harder to form. Sodium hydroxide is a rust inhibitor.


It is. Phosphoric acid is in many rust inhibitors.


Iron and steel rust when they come into contact with water and oxygen. They rust faster in salty water or acid rain


Tell you what - the more likely scenario is that iron reacts with oxygen to form 6.2g of Fe2O3. That's the rusting of iron; I don't know if you can "un-rust" iron back into pure iron and oxygen. So we'll go with this equation:4Fe + 3O2 --> 2Fe2O3.Iron (Fe) is our unknown. Okay, Fe2O3, which is iron(III) oxide, has a given mass of 6.2g, and according to the periodic table, it's molar mass, or grams per 1 mole, is 160g/mol (56+56+16+16+16). Do a 1-step molar conversion to get about 0.03875 moles. Apply this to the molar ratio of coefficients in the balanced equation: the ratio is 2:4, or 1:2, so you will double that to 0.0775 moles of iron. Now do a 1-step molar conversion with iron's atomic mass to get your grams of iron: 0.0775 moles x 56 grams per mole = 4.34 grams Fe.




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