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Answered 2015-03-17 13:04:12

The Crown Jewels have been valued by some people at 20 million pounds (39 million dollars). I must point out that this is pure speculation, as the Crown Jewels have not been valued, only for insurance purposes, and this is kept secret.

No they're actually worth inexcess of £20 Billion, and that's a very conservative estimate, some say they are actually priceless.

The Diamond in the royal scepter...The Star of Africa alone is estimated to be worth $400 million. 20 billion pounds is a bit much....The total worth of the crown jewels is probably closer to 3-5 Billion.
Of no real value in a way! Although priceless, if they were stolen they could never come on the open market to be sold as everyone would know what they are. So no price could be put on them They could, however, be altered - e.g. the gold could be melted down and the precious stones could be cut up and repolished into smaller ones. In this case the value would decrease considerably as large diamonds are so much more rare than smaller ones and hence far more valuable. So, the short answer is no one knows. Incidently, the Crown jewels, for this reason, are not even insured. After all, who in their right mind would want to pay out if they were stolen? However, the security surrounding the jewels, despite the fact that they are freely on view in he Tower of London, is state-of-the-art.

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Queen Elizabeth has several crowns. The crown jewels are priceless as a collection and it would be impossible to sell them. There are certainly several million pounds worth of jewels alone in the collection.


Much the same as the last one. The British Crown Jewels have remained substantially unchanged for centuries.


The "Imperial State Crown" is a part of what is collectively known as the "Crown Jewels". Due to the 3,000 plus precious gems comprising the crown, it probably defies valuation and falls into the category of "priceless".


maybe over a billion pounds


The "St. Edwards Crown" is a part of what is collectively known as the "Crown Jewels". Due to the 444 precious gems comprising the crown and the fact that it is constructed from solid gold, it probably defies valuation and falls into the category of "priceless".


Good luck if you have one, but the last British Sixpence was minted in 1967.


Apart from India's natural resources, labour, manpower, history and pretty much nearly every object and item of worth and culture including the Koor-I-Noor, the largest Diamond on Earth (now residing as a part of the Crown Jewels), I can't think of much


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This is not actually Canadian, it's a British crown. These sell for about a dollar.


One crown was worth 60 pence, or 1/4 of a pound.


depends on the value of the jewels depends on the value of the jewels


You'd have to be more specific about WHICH jewels. -There are a lot of extremely rich people, big jewellery stores and museums in Monaco.


All years of issue of the British 20 Pence coin are still in circulation and are worth 20 Pence in Britain and its dependencies. As at 14-May-2012, 20 Pence British is worth about $0.32 USD.


How much would 10000.00 british pounds be worth in American money?


they just didnt want it found it was worth a lot


In what county? Next question say which country USA


two bob or half a crown in old money




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The Koh-i-noor Diamond is not for sale, since it is part of the British Crown Jewels. However, its size, currently 105.602 carats, means that if it were D colour -- which is a good guess, one like it might sell in the US billion dollar range, or more.



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