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US Coins

How much does a real nickel weigh out of the mint?

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2009-05-27 04:23:30
2009-05-27 04:23:30

A nickel weighs 5 grams, or 5000 milligrams, if you wish it in those units. That's about 0.17637 ounces.

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A U.S quarter weighs approximately 6.1 grams The actual weight as defined by US mint is 5.670 grams. Five of them will weigh almost exactly one ounce. Try this web site: http://www.usmint.gov/faqs/circulating_coins/index.cfm?flash=yes&action=faq_circulating_coin


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