How much hay do horses eat in a month?

The amount of hay fed to a horse in a month will depend on the horses weight and amount of work it does. A horse needs to consume about 1.5% to 3.0% of it's own body weight daily, 2.0 to 2.5% is average. A horse in light or no work should be fed 100% hay or grass daily , a horse in moderate exercise can be fed 60% hay 40 % grain or 75% hay 25% grain depending on the horse daily. A horse in heavy exercise will need no less than 50% hay daily. For example a 1,000 pound horse will need to eat roughly 20 pounds of feed a day (2.0% of bodyweight). If the horse is in light to no work then it would receive 20 pounds of hay. In moderate work it would get 12 to 15 pounds hay or more, and in heavy work it would get at least 10 pounds of hay daily. Once you have the amount for the daily intake down you simply multiply it by 30 to get the monthly intake, 600 pounds (light to no work), 360 to 450 pounds (moderate), 300 pounds (heavy). Keep in mind that these are just basics and you may have to adjust according to the individual horse itself.
The amount of hay fed to a horse in a month will depend on the horses weight and amount of work it does. A horse needs to consume about 1.5% to 3.0% of it's own body weight daily, 2.0 to 2.5% is average. A horse in light or no work should be fed 100% hay or grass daily , a horse in moderate exercise can be fed 60% hay 40 % grain or 75% hay 25% grain depending on the horse daily. A horse in heavy exercise will need no less than 50% hay daily. For example a 1,000 pound horse will need to eat roughly 20 pounds of feed a day (2.0% of bodyweight). If the horse is in light to no work then it would receive 20 pounds of hay. In moderate work it would get 12 to 15 pounds hay or more, and in heavy work it would get at least 10 pounds of hay daily. Once you have the amount for the daily intake down you simply multiply it by 30 to get the monthly intake, 600 pounds (light to no work), 360 to 450 pounds (moderate), 300 pounds (heavy). Keep in mind that these are just basics and you may have to adjust according to the individual horse itself.