How much money does a phlebotomist earn?

The median expected salary for a typical Phlebotomist in the United States is $49,000.

Hourly wages paid to phlebotomists in the US increased 6.2 percent between 2000 and 2002, according to a recent survey conducted by the American Society for Clinical Pathology. Those at the bottom of the pay scales in rural facilities got the biggest percentage raises, earning on average 14.6 percent more by the end of the period. The top wage earners at private clinics or reference laboratories showed no gains.

Phlebotomists with the highest hourly wages were at the top of pay scales in facilities located in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. Top-earning phlebotomists in these states made $26 per hour, four dollars more than their lowest-paid coworkers.

The second-highest-paid wage earners by region work in top jobs in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont, earning an average of $18 per hour.

The lowest-paid phlebotomists in the US work in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas and are at the low end of the pay scales in their facilities, earning $8 per hour. That's up from $7.10 two years ago but almost three dollars an hour less than their highest-paid, nonsupervisory coworkers.

Hospital phlebotomists earn between $9 and $12.34 per hour, while those who work in outpatient clinics bring home between $10 and $13.36 per hour. Those working in private physicians' practices earn between $9 and $11, while those in private clinics and reference labs earn between $9 and $12.

When it comes to hospital phlebotomists, size matters. Those working in facilities with fewer than 100 beds earn between $8.50 and $11 per hour, while those employed by hospitals with 500 or more beds bring home between $9.63 and $13.50 per hour.

As expected, location is an important factor in phlebotomy wages. If you work at the high end of the pay scale in a large city, you make on average $2.76 per hour more than your counterpart in a rural area ($13.72 versus $10.76).

Factoring in all categories surveyed, the lowest-paid phlebotomists work in the West South Central states (listed above) in a rural area, in either a hospital with fewer than 100 beds, a private clinic/reference lab or a physician's office. Top wage earners work at the high end of their employers' scales in hospitals with more than 500 beds in large cities.

Ask someone at the reference desk of your local public library for the Occupational Outlook Handbook. It lists all kinds of information you would need to know,(including the salary) of just about any occupation you can think of.

The median expected salary for a typical Phlebotomist in the United States is $26,128.