answersLogoWhite
notificationBell

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2013-01-17 05:39:41

Most states always give 100% of their electoral votes to the candidate with a simple majority of popular votes. Therefore, with three candidates, it is theoretically possible to be elected unanimously with only 34% of the popular votes.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Your Answer

Related Questions



The District of Columbia and 48 U.S. states (all except Maine and Nebraska) utilize a winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral College. In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate).


The District of Columbia and 48 U.S. states (all except Maine and Nebraska) utilize a winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral College. In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate).


To choose a President, the margin in the electoral college must be 51 percent or 270. There are 538 votes in the electoral college.


The District of Columbia and 48 U.S. states (all except Maine and Nebraska) utilize a winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral College. In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate).



Safe District : Electoral district in which the candidate from the dominant party usually wins by 55 percent or more.


They are determined by the electoral college, swing states such as Ohio have many electoral votes because of the large percent of the population being active voters


George Washington received 100% of the electoral votes and was unanimously elected President in 1789 and 1792.


George Washington, who won 100 percent of the Electoral College in 1789.


not enough to beat obama so who reaaly cares! #2Terms


The District of Columbia and 48 U.S. states (all except Maine and Nebraska) utilize a winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral College. In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate). Maine and Nebraska use the "congressional district method", selecting one elector within each congressional district by popular vote and awarding two electors by a statewide popular vote.


It depends on the state. Most have a winner-take-all approach, where whoever wins gets all the electoral votes. A few states can split their electoral votes, depending on who wins in each district.


In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate).


Theoretically, in the US, a candidate could win over 99% of the popular vote and lose the presidential election by winning 100% of the vote in states adding up to 268 electoral votes and lose the rest of the states (worth 270 electoral votes) by only a fraction of one percent, but realistically this would never happen since it is rare for most states to vote stronger than 70-30 in favor of either candidate, and most states are usually much closer than that.In reality, winning the popular vote and losing the electoral college only happens when the candidates are very close in the popular vote, such as in the 2000 election where Gore won the popular vote by around a half of a percent and Bush won the electoral college. I remember reading on a political site, fivethirtyeight.com, that anywhere up to a four percent win in the popular vote is where that situation has a realistic chance of occurring.Hope this answers your question.


from Wikipedia: For the 46 elections in which the heights of both candidates are known, the taller candidate won 27 times (approximately 59 percent of the time), the shorter candidate won 17 times (approximately 37 percent of the time), and the candidates were the same height two times (about 4 percent of the time). Of those who were not President or Vice president at the time of the election, the popular vote was won by six who were shorter and sixteen who were taller. We might assume, however, that James Madison, the shortest President, was shorter than his opponent, and this would increase the number to seven for the shorter candidate. It should be noted, however, that in three of the cases in which the shorter candidate won, the taller candidate actually received more popular votes but lost in the Electoral College; this happened in 1824, 1888, and 2000 (the other time that the electoral vote winner was not the popular vote winner was in 1876, for which we do not know the height of the loser). So, of the 46 cases for which we have data, the taller candidate has won the popular vote 30 times (65 percent), and the shorter candidate only about 14 times (30 percent of them). This does constitute a statistically significant (p < .05) difference from chance by chi-square test, although this is not the case when electoral victors are considered. If considering restricting to elections in the 20th and 21st centuries, only 8 out of 27 elections were won by the shorter candidate.


Lincoln had the most votes of any candidate, with more electoral votes than the other three candidates combined.


The District of Columbia and 48 U.S. states (all except Maine and Nebraska) utilize a winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral College. In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate). Maine and Nebraska use the "congressional district method", selecting one elector within each congressional district by popular vote and awarding two electors by a statewide popular vote.


The District of Columbia and 48 U.S. states (all except Maine and Nebraska) utilize a winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral College. In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate). Maine and Nebraska use the "congressional district method", selecting one elector within each congressional district by popular vote and awarding two electors by a statewide popular vote.


Theodore Roosevelt received 88 electoral college votes running as under the Progressive Party (Bull-Moose Party). William Howard Taft (Republican) only received 8 electoral college votes. Woodrow Wilson recived 435 votes and won the presidencey.H. Ross Perot was one of the most successful third-party presidential candidates in U.S. history, having won almost 19 percent of the popular vote in the 1992 election while running as an independent But, received none of the electoral college vote.. He garnered only 8 percent of the popular vote in 1996 as a candidate of the Reform Party.


The District of Columbia and 48 U.S. states (all except Maine and Nebraska) utilize a winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral College. In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate). The number of electoral votes for each state is equal to the sum of its and number of Senators and its number of Representatives in the U.S. House of Representatives. Based on the 2010 Census, there are 18 members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Illinois. Therefore, Illinois has 20 electoral votes. Illinois appoints their 20 electors on a winner-take-all basis, based on the Illinois statewide popular vote on Election Day.


In 2008, Obama received 365 of the 538 electoral votes or 67.8% of the electoral vote.In 2012, Obama received 332 of the 538 electoral votes or 61.7% of the electoral vote.


That is easy to explain-- Some other candidate got more votes than he did in every state. He actually got only 18.9% overall. He did best in Maine when he finished second with 30% but Clinton got 38%.


270 electoral votes are needed to win the U.S. presidency. Each state has electoral votes equal to the total of the 2 representative the state has in the U.S. Senate plus the number of representative the state has in the House of Representatives. Since every state has two senators and at least one representative to the House, every state has at least 3 electoral votes. The District of Columbia gets 3 electoral votes. Therefore, the total number of electoral votes is 538 - 100 (senators) + 435 (representatives) + 3 (for DC). A majority is 270 - one more than half of the total number of 538. The District of Columbia and 48 U.S. states (all except Maine and Nebraska) utilize a winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral College. In a winner-take-all state, all of the state's Electoral votes go to whichever candidate receives a majority of the popular vote, or a plurality of the popular vote (less than 50 percent but more than any other candidate).


There were three other candidates in 1860 who all had less than 40 percent of the votes. The popular vote doesn't even determine who becomes president, the electoral college does. Lincoln received more electoral votes than the other 3 candidates combined.