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How would you determine the amperage drawn on each breaker in your electrical panel?


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Wiki User
2015-07-15 19:41:48
2015-07-15 19:41:48

The only way is to use a meter, it does not have to be expensive. Radio Shack offers inexpensive meters. Simply "clamp" the meter around the circuit you want to test.

Good Luck.

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