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Answered 2008-03-07 15:14:46

Get a DNA test. Then if it proves the child isn't yours you won't have to pay child support. You might even be a able to get back the money you have already paid in child support.

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All the way back to when the child was born. You still will owe back child support after the child turns 18.


Yes. You have to legally support the child until she is 18; the only way you don't have to is if the court terminates the child support. You cannot (legally) decide yourself that you no longer have to take care of your child.


You can sign your rights away but you will still have to pay child support if you are the father or mother of the child. There is no way to avoid paying child support.


No, a person will not be ordered to pay child support on any children that are not his. The only way a person would be ordered to pay child support a child who is not theirs is if they had legally adopted that child.


The only way to stop paying child support is to go to court and request that the custody and child support orders be modified.


If you are in the US, the fact that you are now married/pregnant has no effect on child support for another child.


The only time child support stops is when the child turns 18 and it is paid in full with no back child support owed. If there is any child support owed however it still can be collected even if the child is 18 and out of school. The only other way child support may stop is if there is also an adoption even then if there is support owed before the adoption they still get that money. This is all of course if you have a child support order through the courts or it's in a divorce decree.


Once the child has reached maturity, past child support is uncollectable. Frustrating as this is, that is the way it goes.


Not really. Child support is for the care of the child and should be disbursed to the person with legal custody. In other words, you can't have your cake and eat it too.


The only way a mother can be forced to pay child support in any state, is if she does not have primary custody of the child. If the child or children live primarily with the father, then the mother can be made to pay child support.


Child support cannot be ordered if paternity has not been established. However, a court can order a DNA test and order the father to pay back child support all the way from the birth of the child.


One way is if the child is adopted by someone else who is willing to become responsible for supporting the child. Otherwise you need to petition the court to modify or terminate the child support order.


No. Most judges will only collect the child support due at the time that you filed for Child Support so if you filed a case with child support on June 2008 and then got it finalized July of 2009 you would only get from the date that child support was filed, no more and no less. That is the only back child support you will be getting. You can always go back to court and get the child support started and all, but you cannot ask for back child support if you refused it and you did not fill out a Child Support filed case, with your state either. Again get an attorney and/or call your child Support Enforcement Agency and make sure of the laws in your state, but this is in most states. Utah, California and Maine are all this way.


as long as the child support agency is reporting it to credit bureau theres no way but to pay it that i know of


The easiest way is to pay off the child support! Otherwise, you have to go to court and get the judge to waive it.


How much Child Support you pay or receive is based on total gross income. In your search on your computer type in New York Child Support Chart and New York Child Support Calculator. There is no way that a precise figure can be given to this question.


Absolutely not unless that specific provision is recited in the child support order. He must pay his court ordered child support in full. Any other items he provides for the children are simply his way of helping. He does not get to decide how the child support must be spent by deducting his purchases from the amount owed. He actually owes it to his child to provide whatever help he can over and above child support. The custodial parent does numerous extra things for the child every day.Absolutely not unless that specific provision is recited in the child support order. He must pay his court ordered child support in full. Any other items he provides for the children are simply his way of helping. He does not get to decide how the child support must be spent by deducting his purchases from the amount owed. He actually owes it to his child to provide whatever help he can over and above child support. The custodial parent does numerous extra things for the child every day.Absolutely not unless that specific provision is recited in the child support order. He must pay his court ordered child support in full. Any other items he provides for the children are simply his way of helping. He does not get to decide how the child support must be spent by deducting his purchases from the amount owed. He actually owes it to his child to provide whatever help he can over and above child support. The custodial parent does numerous extra things for the child every day.Absolutely not unless that specific provision is recited in the child support order. He must pay his court ordered child support in full. Any other items he provides for the children are simply his way of helping. He does not get to decide how the child support must be spent by deducting his purchases from the amount owed. He actually owes it to his child to provide whatever help he can over and above child support. The custodial parent does numerous extra things for the child every day.


Yes. So long as paternity is established, you will have to pay child support. It is not the child's fault that the father and the mother have separated or that the father has never seen the child. Both parents have an obligation to support the child. The only legal way not to pay child support is if one's parental rights are terminated.


In the US at least, child support and visitation are independant. A parent is still liable for child support all the way until the child reaches the age of majority, even if the parent has no intention of ever seeing the child.


If the mother of the child asks the court for a court-ordered genetic test, and the child does turn out to be yours (99.9% accurate) then yes, you will be court ordered to pay child support and any back child support to when the child was born (depending on the statute of limitations on time in your state). In some states, they can only order you to pay back child support a couple of years, in other states, it is all the way back to when the child was born. Good luck. You must support your child, even if you don't want to be in your child's life.


generally speaking the only way to nullify a child support order is to go to court and ask for it to be lifted.


No, there is no way to legally "opt out" of child support. If a court order has been established for child support, the obliger is required to continue paying, regardless of whether or not the recipient wants to continue receiving payments.


Child support is based on a percentage of net income. In an official opinion by Judge David Grey Ross, Commissioner of the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement, child support obligation ceases while incarcerated.


Not usually. Only the children whose parents are not living together are entitled to support from their fathers by way of the law.


Ordinarily child support will cease on the child's 18th birthday unless there are mitigating circumstances. If it's a case of back child support, it is owed to the custodial parent who carried the financial burden during the period of nonpayment.



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