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Answered 2014-04-19 19:10:21

The probability of getting an even number on at least one of the 3 rolls is 7/8.

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If you rolled a die 120 times, the probability of getting a 6 is one in six. It does not matter how many times you roll the die - the probability is still one in six - except that the long term mean will approach the theoretical value of 0.166... as the number of trials increases.



The answer depends on how many times it is rolled.


You roll it many times. The probability that it lands on a six is the number of times that it lands on a six divided by the number of times the die has been rolled.


When a number cube is rolled twice, there are 36 possible outcomes. (1,1),(1,2),....(6,6). (3,3) occurs only once. Therefore, the probability of rolling a 3 both times is 1/36.


Since the die is rolled (or even rooled) only 5 times, the answer is that the probability is 0.


there is 0% probability, unless you are some super nerd, and calculate the chance of it splitting the six and you getting two threes in one roll :p


Possible outcomes of one roll = 6.Probability of an even number on one roll = 3/6 = 0.5 .Probability of an even number on the second roll = 0.5 .Probability of an even number on the third roll = 0.5 .Probability of an even number on all three rolls = (0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5) = 0.125 = 1/8The probability of at least one odd number is the probability of not gettingan even number on all 3 rolls. That's (1 - 1/8) = 7/8 or 0.875 or 87.5% .


The first roll doesn't matter for probability, it just sets the number to be rolled by the other two. So: P(rolling the same number three times) = P(rolling a particular number)2 = (1/6)2 = 1/36


The probability of a one being rolled in a fair die is 1 in 6, or 0.1666... . The probability of a one not being rolled is 5 in 6, or 0.8333... . The probability, then, of exactly one one being rolled in nine rolls is 1 in 6 times 5 in 6 to the 8th power, or about 0.0388.


On a normal cube, the probability is 0. If there are more than 1 cubes, the answer depends on how many are being rolled for each sum.


A number cube is a six sided figure so I'm going to go with 0%


The theoretical probability of rolling a 5 on a standard six sided die is one in six. It does not matter how many times you roll it, however, if you roll it 300 times, the theoretical probability is that you would roll a 5 fifty times.



The answer depends on how many times in total the dice are rolled. As the total number of rolls increases, the probability rolling a 6 and 4 three times in a row increases towards 1.


Conduct the following experiment: Roll a number cube 50 times. Count the number of times you roll a 2. Divide that number by 50. That is the experimental probability. The answer that I might get may well be different to yours. And if you do you experiment another time, the answer is likely to be different.


The probability of rolling an even die and then an odd die is (3 in 6) times (3 in 6), which is the same as (1 in 2) times (1 in 2), which is the same as 0.5 time 0.5, which is 0.25.


P(1or2)=2/6=1/3 P(4<=x<=6)=2/3 when rolled 15 times (2/3)^15=.0023


The probability that 14 is rolled at least once is 1 - 5.5*10-32 which, for all intents and purposes, can be treated as 1.



P(not even) = P(odd) = 3/6=1/3 When rolled 6 times, the probability of an even number not showing up is (1/3)^6 = 1/729.


If the coin is tossed and the die rolled sufficiently many times then the probability is 1: the event is a certainty.For just one toss and roll, the probability is 0.25


The probability is 0.5The probability is 0.5The probability is 0.5The probability is 0.5


The probability of getting an even sum on two dice is 18 in 36 or 1 in 2 or 0.5. The probability of doing that three times in a row is 0.53 or 0.125.



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