Cooking Poultry

If a recipe calls for chicken stock can you use chicken broth instead?

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2010-02-26 21:10:55
2010-02-26 21:10:55

Yes. The only difference is the way the broth is simmered. When making broth you use the whole chicken whereas stock you use the bone.

The only time it would make a difference is when you are using it to degalze a pan. Unlike broth, stock will bind with the dripping to create a sauce.

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