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If a runner does not go all the way back to the base when the pitcher is on the rubber is he able to steal before the pitcher pitches in little league ages 10-12?

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Wiki User
2010-06-10 22:08:11
2010-06-10 22:08:11

I think the stealing rule in Little League is NO leading, runner cannot start running until the ball crosses the strike zone or is hit by the batter.

There are no lead-offs in Little League. (except Senior & Big League)

Correct answer

If a runner is heading back to the base when the pitcher is on the mound, he MUST go back to the base, otherwise he can be called out. Now if you get a secondary lead after the pitch already crossed the plate, and you do not start to head back to your base, then you may advance as the pitcher is getting on the rubber, this would be considered a "delayed steal" --- however, you must make your motion to advance BEFORE the pitcher is on the rubber, otherwise you must retreat back to your base

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