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If an unlicensed driver rear ended you and fled but you got his licence plate and made a police report but ins co says there is little they can do to have the guy admit fault is he going to get away?

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2005-10-12 17:54:54
2005-10-12 17:54:54

If the driver is not licensed, but he or the family owner is with a up to date policy, it's doesn't matter, the insurance company should be liable. There is damamge on your vehicle and from the other vehicle, and you have a police report and hope that you have a case number when the report was made at the scene, you should not have a problem. Same situation happened to me, now the police would like to talk to the guy so they can arrest him for failure to give information an other things. Here's the catch, if you are the only one who seen him drive and hit your vehicle, chances the police have little to go on and he gets away, but if you have a witness, chances are good to lock him up! The reason why he fled was he was drunk or have been drinking or drugs. Now of course he had no license too! Your insurance will see to your vehicle in getting fix, in the mean time do your own investigation about getting that guy info and you will be fast than the cops!! Keo

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An unlicensed driver will probably get cited for not having a license and may even get their car impounded, but is not automatically at fault. The person that the police and insurance company determine caused the accident would be at fault.

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If the owner of the truck allowed an unlicensed driver to take the truck, then the owner is responsible - even if the driver lied about where he was going. If the unlicensed driver just took the truck, then a police report would need to be filed and charges pressed against that person - he can be sued for damages.

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because police have rights to stop and fine the driver who is over speeding. Its a matter of safety for yourself and others, they can fine driver for this offence. Police can suspend your licence on the spot if you are driving more than 45 km over the limit

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yes, as long as she is driving on private property, i.e. a parking lot, then the police cannot ticket a unlicensed driver.. they are typically not inclined to ticket an unlicesed driver in any case, as long as they are in the car with a licensed driver.

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Bad things, will mostly likely get a few citation from police. If he is found to be at fault he could be liable for the damage.

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I have tracked your IP address the police are on there way

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So at this point depending where you live:You may be responsible to pay all damagesMay be charged for both misdemeanor and Felony crimesYour insurance company may decide your car had no coverage because you allowed another person to drive it. The only up side is that your local police MAY allow you to charge the unlicensed driver with auto theft as he lied about his drivers licence. If they do your insurance should cover this.If the police decide that you knew or should have known about his drivers licence problem and if he harmed someone you would be a co-defendant in any criminal prosecution.

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This is a standardised licence which shows that a police officer has been appropriately trained in the various aspects of his/her role. The licence can only be obtained following rigorous training and tests.

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people with a licence police trusted people

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They need to have full licence to drive their police cars around the road.

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No. Just the fact of being unlicensed does not mean that the driver did something that caused the accident. Being unlicensed is what is called a non-moving violation. Another violation of this type may be not having a current registration tag on the vehicle. Just because you don't have a tag on your car doesn't automatically make you at fault for someone hitting your car. Fault for the accident will have to be determined by the police officers after they investigate the scene and take statements from witnesses. The person who is driving without a drivers license will get a ticket for not being licensed and then whoever was at fault will receive a violation for whatever they did to cause the accident.

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No! You can buy any vehicle you like from a police car auction however you will need a licence to drive the vehicle on public roads. Either arrange transportation or someone with a licence to remove the vehicle from the police auction

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If you are a police officer then watch it on your computer!

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you would go to the police stations to get a liquor licence

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The police arbitrarily chooses which car is considered Driver one and Driver two. You have to read the report to determine who is at fault.

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You must have either a Provisional or Full Licence prior to your application to the Police Force.


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