answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2009-08-06 16:09:17

Missouri don't have a law addressing that. see link

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Your Answer

Related Questions


Generally, the parent without physical custody but the court will decide.


No. A minor is not allowed to decide, it's the parents or the court.


It's your parents or a judge who decide who you will stay with when you are a minor. Usually one parent have the bigger part of the custody.



No, there is still a parent left with custody. And custody can never be willed. That is for the court to decide. The ones in the will can ask for custody but it is up to the court.


Yes of course. Otherwise there would never be custody fights if only one could decide.



No. A minor cannot be the one to decide with which parent they live. If the parents can't agree on which one has custody, a judge will make the decision during a custody suit. This applies to any children under the age of 18 years.


Sorry, no. Custody has been awarded. If the parents don't mind, they can agree to let the minor stay with either parent, but the minor doesn't get to choose.


If the parents are married and the child is a minor the answer is yes. If the parents are divorced or never married, the parent(s) with legal custody can make that decision.


That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.


A child cannot determine their own custody in any state. If the parent's can't work out a custody arrangement the judge will decide in the best interest of the child.


If the case involves the teen's parents and custody of the teen then she/he has no standing to petition the court. A parent must do it for the child.If the case involves the teen's parents and custody of the teen then she/he has no standing to petition the court. A parent must do it for the child.If the case involves the teen's parents and custody of the teen then she/he has no standing to petition the court. A parent must do it for the child.If the case involves the teen's parents and custody of the teen then she/he has no standing to petition the court. A parent must do it for the child.


The parents decide where a minor lives. If the parents don't agree, a court will decide.


Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.


No, you can not choose until you are 18. If your parent wants custody he/she has to go to court and modify the court order. The court will decide if your parent is fit to take care of you.


Yes. As long as the parents do not have joint legal custody the custodial parent has the legal right to make that decision.Yes. As long as the parents do not have joint legal custody the custodial parent has the legal right to make that decision.Yes. As long as the parents do not have joint legal custody the custodial parent has the legal right to make that decision.Yes. As long as the parents do not have joint legal custody the custodial parent has the legal right to make that decision.


There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.


The child can suggest perhaps, but the final decision rests with the couple and the judge. What usually happens is that couples will have Joint Legal Custody, but one parent or the other will have Primary Custody, leaving the other with Visitation Rights.



If the step parent files for custody, and the judge awards custody of the child to them.


No. If the parents cannot come to an agreement the court will decide who shall have primary physical custody.


It depends on who has legal custody. One parent may have primary physical custody with both parents having joint legal custody.If the parents share legal custody they both have the right to make decisions regarding the child. Of course, they must eventually agree on a course of action. If one parent has sole legal custody that parent has the right to make decisions without any input from the non-custodial parent. That is why many judges only award joint legal custody to parents who are mature, who have the best interest of their child as their main priority and who have a good working relationship. If the parents do not get along and one parent is likely to sabotage every decision-making situation, many judges are more likely to award legal custody to the parent with primary physical custody and grant visitations to the non-custodial parent.It depends on who has legal custody. One parent may have primary physical custody with both parents having joint legal custody.If the parents share legal custody they both have the right to make decisions regarding the child. Of course, they must eventually agree on a course of action. If one parent has sole legal custody that parent has the right to make decisions without any input from the non-custodial parent. That is why many judges only award joint legal custody to parents who are mature, who have the best interest of their child as their main priority and who have a good working relationship. If the parents do not get along and one parent is likely to sabotage every decision-making situation, many judges are more likely to award legal custody to the parent with primary physical custody and grant visitations to the non-custodial parent.It depends on who has legal custody. One parent may have primary physical custody with both parents having joint legal custody.If the parents share legal custody they both have the right to make decisions regarding the child. Of course, they must eventually agree on a course of action. If one parent has sole legal custody that parent has the right to make decisions without any input from the non-custodial parent. That is why many judges only award joint legal custody to parents who are mature, who have the best interest of their child as their main priority and who have a good working relationship. If the parents do not get along and one parent is likely to sabotage every decision-making situation, many judges are more likely to award legal custody to the parent with primary physical custody and grant visitations to the non-custodial parent.It depends on who has legal custody. One parent may have primary physical custody with both parents having joint legal custody.If the parents share legal custody they both have the right to make decisions regarding the child. Of course, they must eventually agree on a course of action. If one parent has sole legal custody that parent has the right to make decisions without any input from the non-custodial parent. That is why many judges only award joint legal custody to parents who are mature, who have the best interest of their child as their main priority and who have a good working relationship. If the parents do not get along and one parent is likely to sabotage every decision-making situation, many judges are more likely to award legal custody to the parent with primary physical custody and grant visitations to the non-custodial parent.


You cannot decide. You can have the other parent request a change of custody, but you cannot do it yourself. They will usually listen to your opinion in court, especially if you are an older teenager.


yes they can, but only if they go through family court with their parents, that way the parents and the judge will decide on visiting rights for either parent if one is the custodial parent, if it is joint custody the parents have equal rights in visitation.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.