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2008-05-22 17:08:16
2008-05-22 17:08:16

Life insurance is not considered part of an estate and is not available to pay the decedent's bills and debts. Even if there is no money whatsoever to pay bills, the insurance is not part of the estate. The only exception would be if there were no existing named beneficiaries or if the policy is payable to the estate. But even there, keep in mind that it isn't the "insurance" money that is now available to pay the debts. It is "estate" money, because the proceeds were payable to the estate. The Federal government will include life insurance proceeds as part of the gross estate for federal estate tax purposes, but that does not mean they are actually part of the estate.

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