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2015-06-24 16:57:51
2015-06-24 16:57:51

If you are only on the title, then your credit will not be affected.

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Let me answer the question this way: the addition of somebody with low credit can't help a mortgage application, and may kill it. A lot depends on the mortgage being applied for (all mortgages have, as a criteria for acceptance, a range of acceptable credit scores) and how low, in fact, the spouse's credit scores are. Talk it over with the professional handling your mortgage. If, for instance, you need to add the spouse for income reasons, you might be better off to get a different sort of mortgage. Good luck.


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Not unless your spouse is on the title to the property. If not and your spouse signs, then your spouse will be fully responsible for paying the mortgage.Not unless your spouse is on the title to the property. If not and your spouse signs, then your spouse will be fully responsible for paying the mortgage.Not unless your spouse is on the title to the property. If not and your spouse signs, then your spouse will be fully responsible for paying the mortgage.Not unless your spouse is on the title to the property. If not and your spouse signs, then your spouse will be fully responsible for paying the mortgage.


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You will have to ask your banker. You can't always. The spouse's credit may not be good enough.


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If they are not listed on the mortgage, then they have no legal obligation to pay the debt. If payments are not made it is only your credit that will be damaged.



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