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Answered 2009-12-03 22:19:18

Yes, Medicare is primary. Medicaid is always the payor of last resort.

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Over 35 million Americans have medicare, and over 36 million receive medicaid. (Note; some people have both. )


The answer depends on what type of Aetna Medicare Plan you have. If you have an Aetna Medicare Supplemental Plan, then Original Medicare pays first and the Aetna plan pays secondary If you have an Aetna Medicare Advantage HMO Plan, then the Aetna plan will always be primary as Medicare has assigned the benefits over to Aetna for processing and administration.



Medicare is a federal government program, usually for people over 65 or those with disabilities. Medicaid is a state program and varies by state. Usually Medicaid covers low income population


The largest recipients of Medicare are people over 65 years old. The largest recipients of Medicaid in terms of dollars spent are indigent nursing home residents and disabled persons. The largest recipients of Medicaid in terms of population are persons under age 18.


As long as the only reason you are covered by Medicare is because of a disability and you haven't reached the minimum age Medicare requires to become eligible naturally, then the number of members in the group health plan will determine who is primary or secondary. Group plans with fewer than 100 members are considered to be "small" businesses and Medicare would be primary. Conversely, "large" businesses (more than 100 members) will be primary over Medicare. It doesn't matter whether the group plan is provided by you or your spouse. At the time you reach Medicare's required age to naturally become eligible with them, your case will be reviewed. At that point, the group size doesn't matter. If you have other coverage provided by you or your spouse, it will always be primary over Medicare. Medicare won't become primary until both you and your spouse have retired and are no longer covered by a group health plan. Medicare supplement plans are always secondary to Medicare, but then those aren't group health plans.


I believe it is the transfer of processed claims from Medicare to Medicaid or state agencies and insurance companies that provide supplemental insurance benefits to Medicare beneficiaries.


Medicaid is a program for persons with limited resources. It covers various sorts of medical care including prescriptions. Medicare Part D covers prescription costs only, for persons over age 65. One does not have to be poor to qualify for Medicare Part D.


Medicare is for individuals over the age of 65.Are you asking about Medicaid which is state insurance for low-income individuals?


Medicare is a Federally-administered health insurance program for eligible persons over 65 or disabled. Medicaid is a State-administered public assistance program for low income persons over 65, under 18 or caring for someone under 18, or disabled.


Medicare is health insurance for persons over age 65 and certain persons who receive Social Security disability payments, who have 40 credits of "covered employment" (i.e., calendar quarters during which they paid into Medicare). Medicare is funded by payroll taxes and administered by the Federal government. Medicaid provides care for indigent citizens under age 18 and their parents, persons over age 65, and those permanently and totally disabled. Medicaid is supervised by the Federal government, administered by the States, and funded by State and Federal taxes. [N.b., as a result of health insurance reform, by 2014 Medicaid will be available to any indigent citizen, regardless of age or disability.]


I do not know what the cost is, but there is no point to such a person paying for additional insurance. Medicaid will cover whatever expenses are left over after Medicare, including the cost of the nursing home itself.


The answer to that question depends on a few things. 1. Group insurance policies are always primary over personal or self bought policies...ie You work for ABC company. You have insurance thru them (group policy) and you also pay for an individual or personal policy. Your policy thru ABC would be primary 2. Government insurance (except for medicare) is always 2nd...ie Tricare, medicaid, and etc. 3. An active policy is always primary over a retiree policy. For example John retired from ABC company and has insurance thru them. He currently works for DCE company and has a policy thru them. The DCE policy would be primary and the ABC policy 2ndary 4. If you are retired and have medicare. Then medicare is primary but if you are actively working your group insurance would be primary. 5. When it comes to children the order is 1. Parent who's birth month comes 1st if both parents are born in the same month it goes by the day (the year doesn't play a role in this) 2. If parents are divorce it goes by 1. court order if not applicable goes by who has custody is primary this includes step parents. The step parent who has custody of a child, their insurance is primary. There are a few other rules when it comes to who is primary...when in doubt contact your insurance company


Medicare is health insurance for persons over age 65, persons with end state renal disease and persons who receive Social Security disability payments. The individual must have 40 credits of "covered employment" (i.e., calendar quarters during which they paid into Medicare), or be the spouse or dependent of such individual. Medicare is funded by payroll taxes and administered by the Federal government. Medicaid provides care for indigent citizens under age 18 and their parents, persons over age 65, and those permanently and totally disabled. Medicaid is supervised by the Federal government, administered by the States, and funded by State and Federal taxes. [N.b., as a result of health insurance reform, by 2014 Medicaid will be available to any indigent citizen, regardless of age or disability.]


Medicare is health insurance for persons over age 65, persons with end state renal disease and persons who receive Social Security disability payments. The individual must have 40 credits of "covered employment" (i.e., calendar quarters during which they paid into Medicare), or be the spouse or dependent of such individual. Medicare is funded by payroll taxes and administered by the Federal government. Medicaid provides care for indigent citizens under age 18 and their parents, persons over age 65, and those permanently and totally disabled. Medicaid is supervised by the Federal government, administered by the States, and funded by State and Federal taxes. [N.b., as a result of health insurance reform, by 2014 Medicaid will be available to any indigent citizen, regardless of age or disability.]


Medicare is health insurance for persons over age 65, persons with end state renal disease and persons who receive Social Security disability payments. The individual must have 40 credits of "covered employment" (i.e., calendar quarters during which they paid into Medicare), or be the spouse or dependent of such individual. Medicare is funded by payroll taxes and administered by the Federal government. Medicaid provides care for indigent citizens under age 18 and their parents, persons over age 65, and those permanently and totally disabled. Medicaid is supervised by the Federal government, administered by the States, and funded by State and Federal taxes. [N.b., as a result of health insurance reform, by 2014 Medicaid will be available to any indigent citizen, regardless of age or disability.]


Medicare is health insurance for persons over age 65 and certain persons who receive Social Security disability payments, who have 40 credits of "covered employment" (i.e., calendar quarters during which they paid into Medicare). Medicare is funded by payroll taxes and administered by the Federal government. Medicaid provides care for indigent citizens under age 18 and their parents, persons over age 65, and those permanently and totally disabled. Medicaid is supervised by the Federal government, administered by the States, and funded by State and Federal taxes. [N.b., as a result of health insurance reform, by 2014 Medicaid will be available to any indigent citizen, regardless of age or disability.]


Medicare is health insurance for persons over age 65 and certain persons who receive Social Security disability payments, who have 40 credits of "covered employment" (i.e., calendar quarters during which they paid into Medicare) and dependents of such persons. Medicare is funded by payroll taxes and administered by the Federal government. Part A covers hospital care and Part B covers services by physicians, surgeons and other providers. Medicaid provides care for indigent citizens under age 18 and their parents, persons over age 65, and those permanently and totally disabled. Medicaid is supervised by the Federal government, administered by the States, and funded by State and Federal taxes. [N.b., as a result of health insurance reform, by 2014 Medicaid will be available to any indigent citizen, regardless of age or disability.]


Medicare only covers up to 100 days If they see improvement of the health. Doctors pen. Medicaid has a spend down limit. Yes, Medicare covers people over 65, and some people with disabilities. And Medicaid covers some poor people. But Medicare only pays a small percentage of the cost of quality nursing home care. Medicaid can cover about half. Also, many economists are convinced that the current Medicare and Medicaid are unsustainable as the U.S. population ages. Benefits will have to be cut even further in the future. Medicare will only cover up to 100 days of "recovery" care. That means that a person must be showing continuous signs of improvement. If an individual has cognitive ( mental ) impairment, such as Alzheimer's, or needs continuous help with activities of daily living ( ADL's ) , such as eating, bathing, toileting, mobility, dressing or continence, then Medicare does not , and will not, cover the cost of long term care. Medicaid will cover the costs, but only after a person has spent down their assets to the poverty level of their state.


In general, Medicaid does not cover over-the-counter items.


Medicaid covers persons with limited resources who are 65+ years old, younger than 18, have a dependent child younger than 18, or are totally and permanently disabled as defined by Social Security regulations. Mental illness can be considered a total and permanent disability.Medicare covers persons over 65, regardless of resources.I'm not familiar with medical care for veterans.


Medicare is a Federal program for People over 65 or have kidney failure or are disabled. Medicaid is a State program, primarily for people with low income. It's generally available for kids under 19 or pregnant women or people who are blind or disabled or over 65 or need nursing home care. Some people can qualify for both.


Medicaid does not cover obesity, and under Medicare, hospital and physician services for obesity are clearly excluded. Medicaid is a government program that provides health insurance to qualified individuals whose income level is below a certain point. Recipients of Medicaid are primarily women and children who are poor and members of minority groups. Given the high prevalence of obesity among those populations, it could be presumed that many Medicaid recipients are likely to have obesity. Medicare provides health insurance coverage to elderly citizens and disabled Americans who qualify by meeting criteria of the Social Security Administration (SSA) and completing a two-year waiting period. i do not know if medicaid covers the lap band surgery however it does cover gastric bypass surgery ive had gastric bypass surgery over 4years ago and medicaid did cover alought i did have breathing problems due to weight call you local office and ask for the info directly for ny 18005055678 that answer before made no sense!!!!!love yourself do research and ask othersMedicare Part A does cover Obesity Bariatric Surgery but for specifics you need to contact your states medicare office because coverage can vary from state to state. Note: Medicare Part B is doctor's coverage. Medicare Part A(hospital coverage) doesn't have specific coverage on the subject but it does cover certain costs related to staying in the hospital for any reason. (Added 09/07/10)


Medicare covers the elderly and people with certain disabilities and end-stage renal disease regardless of income level. Medicaid eligibility is for the poor and is based on low income, family size and a few other requirements. Actually, they can. You only have to be poor and disabled, unable to work..that equals poor. You qualify for both. I know a few people who have both. It is pretty common for people to have Medicaid and Medicare. This is called dual eligible. The above answer is correct in that a person must be elderly or disabled to qualify, and because a disabled person is not eligible to work they more usually qualify for Medicaid. Of course this depends on other income (ie. spousal income), and any assets. Medicare is federal program so the eligibility is the same in every state, Medicaid however is a state program so eligibility will depend on the state your daughter resides in. I used to sell Medicare Advantage plans. My mother has been on both for over 50 years! She became disabled at age 25, and is now going on 76 years old. She has both and also had SSI to boot, but recently became ineligible because she is now in a boarding home.


Medicare is health insurance for persons over age 65, persons with end state renal disease and persons who receive Social Security disability payments. The individual must have 40 credits of "covered employment" (i.e., calendar quarters during which they paid into Medicare), or be the spouse or dependent of such individual. Medicare is funded by payroll taxes and administered by the Federal government. Medicaid provides care for indigent citizens under age 18 and their parents, persons over age 65, and those permanently and totally disabled. Medicaid is supervised by the Federal government, administered by the States, and funded by State and Federal taxes. [N.b., as a result of health insurance reform, by 2014 Medicaid will be available to any indigent citizen, regardless of age or disability.]