Education

If you are still in public school when you turn 18 do your parents still have legal rights over you?

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2006-07-15 04:53:03
2006-07-15 04:53:03

No. 18 means you are legally responsible for yourself. Public schools have no impact.

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No, parents who have given up their parental rights do not have to attend meetings in school. If your parents have asked you to do this it's probably because they want you to be more involved in your children's lives.


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No. Not in public school at least.


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When you become of legal age and gain these rights yes, until then no.


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You can see if your public or school library bought the ebook rights to the books. That is legal. Anything else is stealing from the author and publisher.



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