Custody

If you share joint custody but have physical custody can child live with parent not having physical custody?

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2009-10-27 07:17:53
2009-10-27 07:17:53

Only Texas has that law, but with significant restrictions. In all other states, it's a case by case basis, with the Judge interpreting the maturity of the child, and their intent, but this still does not override other evidence in the child's best interest. It's just a piece of the evidence.

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The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.


The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.


Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.


Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.


That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.


Not if you do not have legal physical custody. The school would not have any right to release the child to you if the other parent has sole physical custody.Not if you do not have legal physical custody. The school would not have any right to release the child to you if the other parent has sole physical custody.Not if you do not have legal physical custody. The school would not have any right to release the child to you if the other parent has sole physical custody.Not if you do not have legal physical custody. The school would not have any right to release the child to you if the other parent has sole physical custody.


It depends on the type of joint custody. Custody is broken down into two subcategories- legal and physical. Legal custody is the ability to make decisions concerning the child and to act on the child's behalf. Physical custody is who the child lives with. Typically unless the child spends exactly 50 percent of the time with each parent, one parent is considered to have primary custody and the other parent to have secondary custody or visitation rights. Child support is based on who has primary physical custody, and that parent is typically awarded child support from the parent who has the child less since having the child more usually means that you provide for more of their needs as well.


Physical custody means that a person (typically the parent) has the right to have the child living with them. This could be sole physical custody, or even joint physical custody in which the parents share custody of their child.


That depends on the income of the parties, age of the child, state child support guidelines, which parent has physical custody, etc.That depends on the income of the parties, age of the child, state child support guidelines, which parent has physical custody, etc.That depends on the income of the parties, age of the child, state child support guidelines, which parent has physical custody, etc.That depends on the income of the parties, age of the child, state child support guidelines, which parent has physical custody, etc.


That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.


Generally, no. You need to check your custody agreement and state law. Many states allow the parent with physical custody to claim the child as a dependent.Generally, no. You need to check your custody agreement and state law. Many states allow the parent with physical custody to claim the child as a dependent.Generally, no. You need to check your custody agreement and state law. Many states allow the parent with physical custody to claim the child as a dependent.Generally, no. You need to check your custody agreement and state law. Many states allow the parent with physical custody to claim the child as a dependent.


Not take but they can petition for custody in court. Unless the parent is unfit the most they will get is probably shared custody though.


Primary parent may informally refer to the parent with whom the child lives for the majority of the time. Primary physical custody is the legal term for the parent with physical care and supervision of their child for the majority of the time.Child support and custody is an extremely complicated area of law in Nevada which is somewhat behind the times in defining and clarifying these issues. If you need legal advice in that area you need to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law and who has a good reputation.A parent may have sole legal custody or joint legal custody.A parent with sole legal custody can make all the decisions regarding the child such as education, medical treatment and religious training.Joint legal custody means that both parents have a equal right to make decisions regarding the child. Parents with joint legal custody may have different arrangements regarding physical custody. They may share physical custody equally or the child may spend more time with one parent. If a parent has physical custody of the child for the majority of the time they are considered to be the primary parent.Physical custody is a different issue. Nevada recognizes three forms of physical custody:sole physical custody- sole physical care and supervisionprimary physical custody- physical care and supervision for the majority of the timejoint physical custody- parents share physical care and supervision


Shared legal custody means that both parents have equal rights to make decisions regarding the child. One parent may have physical custody with the non-physical-custody parent paying child support.


Generally, if one parent is found to be unfit the other parent will have sole legal and physical custody. Courts favor the biological parent in regards to custody.Generally, if one parent is found to be unfit the other parent will have sole legal and physical custody. Courts favor the biological parent in regards to custody.Generally, if one parent is found to be unfit the other parent will have sole legal and physical custody. Courts favor the biological parent in regards to custody.Generally, if one parent is found to be unfit the other parent will have sole legal and physical custody. Courts favor the biological parent in regards to custody.


ANSWER:Physical custody refers to who the child lives with, the child's main care giver. Legal custody determines who can make decisions concerning the child. There are many variations.Examples:One parent can have sole physical custody with both parents sharing legal custody.One parent can have sole physical and legal custody while the other parent has visitation rights.


No. Physical custody does not give you the right to bring a lawsuit on behalf of the child. The parent(s) with legalcustody must be the one to sue.


Of course not. Child support payments are paid over to the parent with legal physical custody.


Generally, the parent with the greater amount of physical custody is entitled to child support.


This entrusts the legal and physical custody of the child in only one of the parents. The parent granted Sole Custody makes all major decisions for the child without having to consult the non-custodial parent. Sole Custody is generally used in cases where the parties are unable to cooperate in making decisions for the child or in those cases where one parent is absent from the child's life.


The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent. If the parties have shared custody the court will use state guidelines to determine if someone pays child support and how much.


Yes who ever has the child legally can file for child support. But you have to demonstrate to the court that the child has been residing with you and you have the physical custody and you want to keep the physical custody and give the other parent visitation and joint legal custody. This is the fastest way to get things done and a direct answer lol.


It is assumed you mean the parents have joint legalcustody and one parent has physical custody.Generally, the parent with physical custody is awarded the child support since child support is intended to help pay for the child needs, living expenses and all the associated costs of raising the child. The custodial parent has much more in living expenses that are associated with raising the child.See related question link.


Physical custody means that a parent has the right to have a child live with him or her. Some states will award joint physical custody to both parents when the child spends significant amounts of time with both parents. Joint physical custody works best if parents live relatively near to each other, as it lessens the stress on children and allows them to maintain a somewhat normal routine. Where the child lives primarily with one parent and has visitation with the other, generally the parent with whom the child primarily lives will have sole physical custody, with visitation to the other parent. Legal custody of a child means having the right and the obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing. A parent with legal custody can make decisions about schooling, religion, and medical care, for example. In many states, courts regularly award joint legal custody, which means that the decision making is shared by both parents.


California Child Custody Laws refer to both legal custody and physical custody. Legal custody is having the right to make decisions regarding the health, education and welfare of the child such as choosing physicians, medical care, schools, etc. Physical custody is basically where the child lives day to day, with the parent having the right to make day to day decisions for the child. The court can award sole legal and physical custody to a parent, or joint legal and physical custody to both parents or a combination thereof. The general standard for determining custody is "What arrangement is in the Best Interests of the Child." This determination involves looking at every aspect of a child's life including that child's personality and unique characteristics as well as analyzing each of the parent's abilities, personalities and relationship with the child. If you are interested in obtaining custody, be sure to read everything you can about winning custody as early in your action as possible. The parent who is more knowledgeable about the process and better prepared is most often more satisfied with the outcome of a child custody battle.



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