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If your car was repossessed and your father co-signed for it and he is filing for bankruptcy will this be discharged?

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2015-07-15 19:18:46
2015-07-15 19:18:46

Good news and BAD news. It WILL be discharged for him. It WONT be discharged for YOU. You will be expected to pay the WHOLE debt.

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