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In Georgia is the wife responsible for paying outstanding medical bills of her deceased husband?

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Wiki User
2007-08-16 20:33:22
2007-08-16 20:33:22

No, the executor of the estate will be responsible. If there is no estate then the bills will not be paid.

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If the deceased person is your wife then I think you are responsible for her medical bills

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Georgia requires that all debts be resolved before an estate is settled. That means the bills have to be paid before anything can be distributed to the spouse.

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yes in the united states of America unless he had insurance coverage to pay his bills at time of death.

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In many cases the husband will be held responsible. They are deemed to have benefited from to goods and services.

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of course; it would be offensive if not

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Dower rights are the rights a wife has to the property of her deceased husband. They do exist in the state of Georgia.

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His estate...which is actually him continued after death for business purposes. I have received a tax levy in my deceased husband old business account from 2004 Am I responsible

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The estate will be responsible. The husband indirectly will pay, as they cannot inherit until they are resolved.

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Her estate is responsible for the debt. In most cases he will have to pay from the estate or his own pockets.

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The estate will be responsible. The spouse indirectly will pay, as they cannot inherit until they are resolved.

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If she is on the lease then she is just as responsible as her deceased husband.

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It would depend on whether they are legally separated. If they are still married, she could be held responsible.

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No, you would call him your recently departed husband, or your deceased husband.

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In Indiana the estate will be responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.

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In Michigan the estate has the responsibility to settle all debts, including medical bills, not the husband. Once that is done, then remainder can be distributed to the husband.

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She is not directly responsible. The estate is going to be responsible. And since she will likely be getting the bulk of the estate, paying off the debt will reduce her amount.

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In Colorado the estate will be responsible. The spouse indirectly will pay, as they cannot inherit until they are resolved.

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my mother in law died last year and her husband was responsible for her medical bills. Over $200,000.

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In Oklahoma the estate will be responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.

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Indirectly. The estate of the deceased husband is responsible for resolving all of his debts. Since the widow is going to be the primary beneficiary of the estate, she will inherit less because the estate has to pay the debt.

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In Virginia, as in all states, the estate is responsible for all the debts of the deceased. That means before the estate can be settled, all medical bills have to be cleared. If there is not enough in the estate to cover them, the husband may not get anything.

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Only if the married couple resided in a community property state.

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The wife is who ever gets a deceased persons assets also gets their dept also since he was her husband it would have no longer been his debt but instead their dept. All money made in a marriage is the money of both partners equally along with all of the dept even if one person had it before the marriage both become reasonable for paying it.

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Since a married couple are considered to be one economic entity, yes. The wife would be held responsible.


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