Custody

In NJ if mother has sole physical custody of child can we move to another state?

345

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2009-08-19 21:30:35
2009-08-19 21:30:35

Yes, but the father can still file an injunction to prevent it.

001
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


The party with legal custody makes the decision. Physical custody is another matter between the parties. Many couples have joint custody with physical custody to the mother. Whoever has legal custody has the right to make important decisions.


Yes if she can prove that it would be the the child's best interest to be with her physically. Custody orders can change at any time. If there is a sign of danger from the child being with the father, the mother can gain physical custody.


If the mother has legal custody but leaves the state and doesn't have physical custody of your child then that must mean the child is with someone who doesn't have custody. I assume you are not married. In that case, you must establish your paternity in court and request legal and physical custody. If the mother has left the state without taking her child with her the court will certainly want to know who the child is with and will certainly consider awarding legal custody to the other biological parent, you.Perhaps you can convince the mother to consent to your getting legal and physical custody. If not sole custody, then joint legal and physical custody.You should consult with an attorneywho specializes in custody issues. The attorney can review your situation and explain your rights and options.


No. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child in the United States. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court via a DNA test. Once established he can petition for custody and/or visitation. He will also be subject to a child support order if he mother is to retain physical custody.No. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child in the United States. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court via a DNA test. Once established he can petition for custody and/or visitation. He will also be subject to a child support order if he mother is to retain physical custody.No. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child in the United States. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court via a DNA test. Once established he can petition for custody and/or visitation. He will also be subject to a child support order if he mother is to retain physical custody.No. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child in the United States. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court via a DNA test. Once established he can petition for custody and/or visitation. He will also be subject to a child support order if he mother is to retain physical custody.


Can a father who has joint custody with the mother stop her from visiting another state with the child


Generally, no. If the mother has full legal and physical custody of that child she can move with that child unless the father has visitation rights. She must comply with the custody and visitation schedule set by the court with jurisdiction.



No. A child is no one's property. An unmarried mother has sole custody until the father establishes his paternity in court. Once paternity is established the father can petition for custody and/or visitation and the court can prepare a child support order as necessary if the mother retains sole physical custody.No. A child is no one's property. An unmarried mother has sole custody until the father establishes his paternity in court. Once paternity is established the father can petition for custody and/or visitation and the court can prepare a child support order as necessary if the mother retains sole physical custody.No. A child is no one's property. An unmarried mother has sole custody until the father establishes his paternity in court. Once paternity is established the father can petition for custody and/or visitation and the court can prepare a child support order as necessary if the mother retains sole physical custody.No. A child is no one's property. An unmarried mother has sole custody until the father establishes his paternity in court. Once paternity is established the father can petition for custody and/or visitation and the court can prepare a child support order as necessary if the mother retains sole physical custody.


As the mother has left he child and moved to another state, the entire custody will be given to the father. And the mother will have no voice.


I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW CAN I GET CUSTODY OF MY COUSIN AWY FROM HER MOTHER


No. If she tries then the father should immediately seek full legal and physical custody of his child.No. If she tries then the father should immediately seek full legal and physical custody of his child.No. If she tries then the father should immediately seek full legal and physical custody of his child.No. If she tries then the father should immediately seek full legal and physical custody of his child.


Even sole custody fathers can be ordered to pay child support, when they earn more than the mother. see links


Physical custody means that a person (typically the parent) has the right to have the child living with them. This could be sole physical custody, or even joint physical custody in which the parents share custody of their child.


Yes, if:- The father retains sole physical custody of the child, the mother has visitation rights and took the child out-of-state during a time she did NOT have visitation with the child; OR- The father retains sole physical custody of the child, the mother has absolutely no parental rights to the child and took the child out-of-state at any time.No, if:- There is a custody arrangement in place, whether as a written or oral agreement between the her and the father, or as an Order for Child Custody, and the mother retains primary or joint (equally shared) physical custody of the child; OR- There is no custody arrangement in place between her and the father, and there is no Order for Child Custody in place, but she retains primary or sole physical custody of the child and/or the father never bothered to petition for custody; OR- There is a custody agreement in place between her and the father, or there is an Order for Child Custody, and the father retains primary or sole physical custody of the child, IF the mother has visitation rights and chose to take the child out-of-state while she had visitation with the child;- Just about any other scenario, other than the two described above under "yes," not otherwise described here.To sum this up, no, the mother probably cannot be charged with parental kidnapping simply for taking her child out of state. The mother has a legal right to travel wherever she chooses with her child unless a court tells her otherwise. In fact, the mother may move out-of-state with the child permanently if she so chooses, and there is nothing the father can do.The fact that the mother and the father were never married is completely irrelevant. The only difference between unmarried parents and divorced parents, is that divorced parents usually submit a custody plan to (or, more often, one parent receives an Order for Primary Physical Custody from) the family court, which explicitly outlines which parent has custody and which has visitation. If the parents never married, and the child lives with the mother, she is the custodial parent (which means she has primary physical custody of the child) and she can take the child wherever she pleases, whenever she wishes. The father has no legal claim to or right to control how the mother cares for the child while she retains custody, and the mother is certainly not required to seek permission or even notify the father of her intent to leave the state with her child so long as she retains custody,



If there is a court or administrative order in place, you owe child support regardless of who has physical custody of the child, until/unless that order is modified or terminated.


Slim to none. Usually the courts will take the view that whoever has custody will retain custody, unless it can be proven that the custodial parent is abusing the child or the child is in physical danger.


The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.


Yes. If the father has sole custody or physical custody the mother will be required to pay child support under normal circumstances. Both parents are responsible for supporting their children.


Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.


The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.


Not if you do not have legal physical custody. The school would not have any right to release the child to you if the other parent has sole physical custody.Not if you do not have legal physical custody. The school would not have any right to release the child to you if the other parent has sole physical custody.Not if you do not have legal physical custody. The school would not have any right to release the child to you if the other parent has sole physical custody.Not if you do not have legal physical custody. The school would not have any right to release the child to you if the other parent has sole physical custody.


The birth mother has sole physical and legal custody of the child until the court rules otherwise


I think it depends on how long the mother will be incarcerated for. There might be a hearing giving the father temporary custody. But if the father ever tries to get full physical custody of the child in the future, it might not be good for the mother. However, she can never be refused visitation.


Yes. The child is your baby. As long as your a fit mother the child cannot be taken away from you. If you are a minor, your parents still have custody of you, but you have custody of your child.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.