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Answered 2014-06-20 01:00:40

In most cases if you are fully insured then your insurance will pay for the uninsured driver's car. However if it is only a third party insurance then most likely you have no cover if it is your fault. However it depends on the insurance company and the policy that you signed.

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Uninsured MotoristUninsured motorist is pretty much insurance where if someone hits you and they lack auto insurance, your insurer will still pay damages for your car.



It's just auto Insurance. If you purchased coverage for uninsured motorists coverage option then yes you will be covered.


If you purchased uninsured motorists coverage with your policy you will be covered. The SR22 is not insurance, it's certificate of proof that you have insurance.


Both the uninsured driver and the friend are in trouble. My GUSS IS the uninsured friend will be liable to any damages he has caused The uninsured friend will be responsible for the damages to their car If insurance is required in your state, the uninsured friend and/or driver could face criminal charges


Typically, the uninsured driver will be cited for it, and your insurance co. is liable for the damages.


This will depend on the type of insurance coverage. The insurance company can decide to go to court and argue that since the driver was uninsured, then they should not be liable for damages.



If you have an accident with an uninsured vehicle, you and your insurance company are still liable for all damages, even though the other vehicle has no insurance. The only thing that will happen to the other driver is a citation for driving with no insurance.


Uninsured motorist coverage provides insurance coverage when you are hit by a person who has no insurance coverage. You uninsured motorist coverage will take the place of the insurance that the other person did not have and will cover your damages just like theirs should have if they had it. The only difference is that you will have a small deductible for property damage coverage.



They can pursue him civilly, and the not at fault driver can also sue for damages.


The owner of the car that caused your damages will be responsible to pay damages to you unless you live in a no-fault state. In that case, your insurance pays for your damages.


The insurance status of the victim's vehicle is irrelevant. The at-fault insurance company will pay for your damages whether your car is insured or not.


Collision insurance will cover the damages to your vehicle- no matter who is at fault. Uninsured coverage is used if the other vehicle is at fault for the accident and you and/or anyone in your car is injured. This coverage will typically pay for related medical bills, loss wages, and general damages (i.e pain and suffering). Liability = Other vehicle damage Injuries to driver/passenger in other vehicle Injuries to passengers in your vehicle if you are at fault Collision/Comprehensive = Cover damages to your car Uninsured/Under-insured = Injuries to you or your passengers when another vehicle is at fault and does not have insurance or has minimum coverage


The at-fault driver's insurance will pay for all property and bodily injury damages.


When a car is uninsured and it involved in an accident, the owner of the car is responsible for its damages and that of the other involved cars. This rule applies even if the driver has his own insurance cover on a different car.


If you have uninsured motorist coverage on your own insurance policy, your insurance will assist you. Often, your insurance will pay your damages and then it will file a civil suit against the other driver to get reimbursed. Also, you can sue the driver individually for the damage. However, many people who are uninsured are in that position because they can't afford insurance, and therefore you may get a judgment that the defendant cannot or will not ever pay.



The clause in a policy of insurance on a motorcycle, provides that if the owner of the motorcycle is injured by a negligent driver of another vehicle who doesn't have liability or insurance, then the insurance company will pay its insured's damages.


If you have automobile insurance with an uninsured motorist property damage endorsement it covers damage to your car caused by an uninsured motorist. If you have collision coverage the endorsement will pay your deductible. If you don't have collision coverage the endorsement will pay for damages up to a set amount, typically $3500. Before it will pay it has to be determined that the other party was at fault and that they have no insurance. In the case of a hit and run driver it wouldn't pay because it would not be possible to determine whether or not they had insurance.


You hope that the other driver responsible in the crash has insurance that covers uninsured drivers and then you sue your friend!


If you have uninsured motorists coverage your insurance company will take the place of the other parties insurance coverage less a small deductible. They will then go after the other party to collect the amount of damages paid out plus your deductible. If and when it is all collected they will send you back your deductible. If your insurance company handles the claim for you and pays your damages you will have no further recourse as you sign over your legal rights to the insurance company under a subrigation agreement.


My husband was hit by an uninsured driver and he only got a 500.00 fine. Oh, and by the way, the UNINSURED driver just filed a claim with my insurance company, to try to receover damages to his car,WHAT about my damages? So, he is trying to get money in an accident he caused, and was driving around illeagally! How crazy is that! I suggest everyone keep full coverage insurance at all times to cover these idiots riding around with none.


Only if you have Uninsured or Under-insured motorists coverage. If so, your insurance company will pay the damages and will legally pursue the other party to recover the funds.