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2007-05-09 14:09:48
2007-05-09 14:09:48

Yes

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Fathers with parental rights are not always listed on the birth certificate.




The birth certificate is not something that gives him parental rights, he have to go to court for that and prove it by DNA test. A birth certificate does not require DNA so it does not hold up in court. So yes, if he has gone to court he has rights.



Probably... But the actual rights must be determined by a court pending a paternity test.



Immigration status has no influence on parental rights but you have to prove paternity in court by a DNA test to get them. Then you can also petition to sign the birth certificate.


The biological father does have parental rights but he have to petition the court for visitation rights and custody.


Immigration status has no influence on parental rights but you have to prove paternity in court by a DNA test to get them. Then you can also petition to sign the birth certificate and to get custody, visitation and pay child support.


If it's established who the biological father is, regardless what name is on the birth certificate, he will have to give up his parental rights in order for someone else to adopt the child. He can also go to court and have the name on the birth certificate changed to his.


Paternity must be established before any discussion of parental rights. In general, parental rights are terminated either preparatory to an adoption, or after a trial in which it is determined that the parent is unfit. In any case, termination of parental rights does not, in itself, terminate child support.


yes If it's established who the biological father is, regardless what name is on the birth certificate, he will have to give up his parental rights in order for someone else to adopt the child. He can also go to court and have the name on the birth certificate changed to his.


no, changing the birth certificate requires adoption, and can only be done if the birth father's parental rights have been terminated.


The birth certificate does not give him parental rights. To get those he has to prove paternity in court by a DNA test. It's also not you who terminate his rights but the court so it's to them you have to turn. If the father objects they will most likely not do it. They usually see it as in the child's best interest to have access to both parents and only allow this in case of adoption when both parents agree.


She ma not know who the father is. Over 30% of paternity tests come out negative. She may think it will prevent him from obtaining parental rights, which it does not.




Anyone can sign away their rights as a parent, my father took the easy way out and didn't put his name on the birth certificate which gave him no parental rights to begin with.


Yes. The father contributed one half of the child's genetic makeup, and that's all that matters, really, to have parental rights, and responsibilities.Depends if he has been to court to actually get his parental rights yet and if not:He needs his lawyer to help him to prove paternity in court and he can then ask for visitation while in prison. Juse being on the birth certificate will not give him rights unless married to the mother. He needs to leave a aDNA test to prove paternity because they are not married.


In the UK, if you are married when your children are born, you both automatically have parental rights. If you are not married, then you have to apply for parental responsibility rights, if the mother does not want to share that with you. This can be done by court order. After 2003, if not married but father is written on the birth certificate, that is enough to have parental responsibility and all that that entails. Not sure how it is for you guys in the USA!


16 with parental consent, I.D. and Birth certificate


An unmarried father has no parental rights until he establishes his paternity in court through a DNA test.An unmarried father has no parental rights until he establishes his paternity in court through a DNA test.An unmarried father has no parental rights until he establishes his paternity in court through a DNA test.An unmarried father has no parental rights until he establishes his paternity in court through a DNA test.


No, if the bio's name is not on the birth cetificate then your husband should be in the clear to adopt your child!!! The father can still challenge



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