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In an electrode-electrolyte circuit what do the terms drift current and diffusion current mean?

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2008-04-13 10:29:15
2008-04-13 10:29:15

A drift current is electric charges being moved in the presence of an electric field, and a diffusion current is electric charges being moved by a chemical diffusion gradient (where no electric field exists, but where there is a concentration gradient of chemical species driving the current).

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no,drift current depends upon electric field where as carrier concentration lead to diffusion current

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The diffusion current in a metal-semiconductor diode is derived based on the assumption that the depletion layer is large compared to the mean free path, so that the concepts of drift and diffusion are valid.

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An electric current is a drift of electric charge -in the case of metal conductors, a drift of free electrons. An electric circuit is the path or route taken by those drifting charge carriers.

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it is a current which has zero drift and it is ugly

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In diodes there are two types of current namely diffusion and drift current. Former one is due to concentration gradient of majority carriers (hole in p side n electron in n-side). Due to this difference of concentration of carriers majority carrier start to diffuse in other side. The amount of diffusion is just depends on concentration. Contrast to this, drift current which is very small in compare to diffusion current depends on the applied voltage across the diode. Since total current is mainly due to diffusion in forward biased hence it is not too much effected by battery's electric field. I dint know that batteries have electric field. INTERESTING.

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The flow of charge carriers is called current...there are many types called drift current,diffusion current,conventional current........in semi conductor devices.... but normally it is of 2 types based on their movement.... 1.Alternating current 2.Direct current

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Current is with water and drift is moving sediments in the current

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The difference between drift current and diffusion current is that drift current depends on the electric field applied: if there's no electric field, there's no drift current. Diffusion current occurs even though there isn't an electric field applied to the semiconductor. It does not have E as one of its parameters. The constants it does depend on are Dp and Dn, and +q and -q, for holes and electrons respectively. The first constants are called the diffusion coefficients, a proportionality factor. We don't worry too much about these because they are constants. We do worry about the gradient of the concentration of p and/or n, though. But, since we are talking about a one dimensional situation when we are solving for current densities, we only worry about the gradient (or derivative) with respect to the x-plane. The other difference between drift current and diffusion current, is that the direction of the diffusion current depends on the change in the carrier concentrations, not the concentrations themselves. In the equation, the signs are reversed as we are used to seeing them. We usually assign a +q to holes and -q to electrons. In the case of diffusion current, they are reversed to be opposite of the derivative of the concentrations. This occurs because the carriers are diffusing from areas of high concentrations to areas of low concentrations. For example, if the derivative of pwith respect to x is positive, then the concentration of holes is growing as you move towards the +x direction. Diffusion current will be the opposite of that, the holes will be diffusing in the -x direction to where there's a lower concentration of holes. If the derivative is negative, the opposite will occur. The concentration of holes is decreasing as you go from the -x to +x direction. Therefore, holes will diffuse to the +x direction where there's a lower concentration of holes. This is why the negative sign is needed in the equation for the hole diffusion current. The same goes for electrons, but in this case, the signs cancel for a positive derivative because the electrons, carrying -q, diffuse to the -x direction where there's less electrons. The sign remains if the derivative is negative, because electrons will be diffusing to the +xdirection carrying a -q charge. For these reasons it's not included in the equation for the electron diffusion current. source: http://www.ece.utep.edu/courses/ee3329/ee3329/Studyguide/ToC/Fundamentals/CAction/diffusion.html The difference between drift current and diffusion current is that drift current depends on the electric field applied: if there's no electric field, there's no drift current. Diffusion current occurs even though there isn't an electric field applied to the semiconductor. It does not have E as one of its parameters. The constants it does depend on are Dp and Dn, and +q and -q, for holes and electrons respectively. The first constants are called the diffusion coefficients, a proportionality factor. We don't worry too much about these because they are constants. We do worry about the gradient of the concentration of p and/or n, though. But, since we are talking about a one dimensional situation when we are solving for current densities, we only worry about the gradient (or derivative) with respect to the x-plane. The other difference between drift current and diffusion current, is that the direction of the diffusion current depends on the change in the carrier concentrations, not the concentrations themselves. In the equation, the signs are reversed as we are used to seeing them. We usually assign a +q to holes and -q to electrons. In the case of diffusion current, they are reversed to be opposite of the derivative of the concentrations. This occurs because the carriers are diffusing from areas of high concentrations to areas of low concentrations. For example, if the derivative of pwith respect to x is positive, then the concentration of holes is growing as you move towards the +x direction. Diffusion current will be the opposite of that, the holes will be diffusing in the -x direction to where there's a lower concentration of holes. If the derivative is negative, the opposite will occur. The concentration of holes is decreasing as you go from the -x to +x direction. Therefore, holes will diffuse to the +x direction where there's a lower concentration of holes. This is why the negative sign is needed in the equation for the hole diffusion current. The same goes for electrons, but in this case, the signs cancel for a positive derivative because the electrons, carrying -q, diffuse to the -x direction where there's less electrons. The sign remains if the derivative is negative, because electrons will be diffusing to the +xdirection carrying a -q charge. For these reasons it's not included in the equation for the electron diffusion current. source: http://www.ece.utep.edu/courses/ee3329/ee3329/Studyguide/ToC/Fundamentals/CAction/diffusion.html The difference between drift current and diffusion current is that drift current depends on the electric field applied: if there's no electric field, there's no drift current. Diffusion current occurs even though there isn't an electric field applied to the semiconductor. It does not have E as one of its parameters. The constants it does depend on are Dp and Dn, and +q and -q, for holes and electrons respectively. The first constants are called the diffusion coefficients, a proportionality factor. We don't worry too much about these because they are constants. We do worry about the gradient of the concentration of p and/or n, though. But, since we are talking about a one dimensional situation when we are solving for current densities, we only worry about the gradient (or derivative) with respect to the x-plane. The other difference between drift current and diffusion current, is that the direction of the diffusion current depends on the change in the carrier concentrations, not the concentrations themselves. In the equation, the signs are reversed as we are used to seeing them. We usually assign a +q to holes and -q to electrons. In the case of diffusion current, they are reversed to be opposite of the derivative of the concentrations. This occurs because the carriers are diffusing from areas of high concentrations to areas of low concentrations. For example, if the derivative of pwith respect to x is positive, then the concentration of holes is growing as you move towards the +x direction. Diffusion current will be the opposite of that, the holes will be diffusing in the -x direction to where there's a lower concentration of holes. If the derivative is negative, the opposite will occur. The concentration of holes is decreasing as you go from the -x to +x direction. Therefore, holes will diffuse to the +x direction where there's a lower concentration of holes. This is why the negative sign is needed in the equation for the hole diffusion current. The same goes for electrons, but in this case, the signs cancel for a positive derivative because the electrons, carrying -q, diffuse to the -x direction where there's less electrons. The sign remains if the derivative is negative, because electrons will be diffusing to the +xdirection carrying a -q charge. For these reasons it's not included in the equation for the electron diffusion current. source: http://www.ece.utep.edu/courses/ee3329/ee3329/Studyguide/ToC/Fundamentals/CAction/diffusion.html

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when ever the external voltage is given the movement of charge carriers produce a current i.e drift current

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Long shore drift is the effect of long shore current because long shore current is the waves of water that causes long shore drift.

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You can drift on all tracks some good tracks to drift on though are the Bernese Alps, Infineon Raceway (Sonoma), Indianapolis Grand Prix circuit, Maple Valley, Tsukuba, Mugello Club circuit, Road Atlanta Club circuit, Sunset Peninsula, Suzuka East circuit, and Fuji Kaido are also one of the most fun to drift on.

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Yes, with the current.

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flow through'Voltage' is simply another name for potential difference, which is the difference in potential between two different points -so, clearly, a voltage is impressed across a circuit. Current, which is a slow drift of electrical charge through a circuit.

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As current is the rate of flow of electric chargesAs I=Q/tso,there must be free electrons for the flow of electric current in a circuit.Then when voltage is applied at the terminals of circuit the free electrons acquire an average velocity called as drift velocity in the opposite direction to that of electric field (-E).Now the free electrons modify there random motion and a steady current begin to flow in a circuit.

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The flow of electrons or is it magnetic fieldsAnswerAn electric current is a drift of electric charge, due to a potential difference. In metal conductors, the electric charges involved are free electrons, but in conducting liquids and gases, they are ions (charged atoms). The drift is extremely slow, in the range of millimetres per hour.

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The North Atlantic Drift and the Alaska Current.

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Plankton are too weak and small to swim against the current.

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west wind drift current or antarctic circumpolar current

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Specifically, drift relates the movement of a carrier (e.g., an electron or hole) to an applied electric field (i.e., the velocity of the carrier is proportional to the electric field, where the proportionality constant, mobility, is a quantity derived in solid-state physics). Diffusion relates the movement of carriers due to random (i.e., thermal) behavior and non-uniform distribution (i.e., the velocity of the carrier is proportional to the logarithmic derivative of the density of carriers, where the proportionality constant, the diffusion constant, is a quantity derived in solid-state physics).

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I was unable to answer this question. :(

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Longshore current is the movement of water nearest the coast. Usually caused by tides. Longshore drift is the movement of beach or coastal material, by longshore drift. The action of waves loosen the material, which is then moved by the current and deposited further down tide. The action is greater during storms.

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The West Wind Drift, also known as Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), is a cold current.The above answer is wrong. The ACC is known by many names including "The West Wind Drift" is either a cold or warm current. You can check the information via this website that I found:http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/fahan_mi_shipwrecks/infohut/acc.htm

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In a current-carrying circuit, a charged particle is accelerated by an electric field. It also undergoes frequent collisions with the stationary ions of the wire material. These two effects result in the very slow net motion (drift) of moving charged particles in the direction of the electric force. The drift velocity describes this motion. Average drift speed for electrons is on the order of 10-4 m/s (Young and Freedman, University Physics).


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