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Is a nickel that has the back of a quarter stamped over the back of the nickel and is blank on the face side worth anything?

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2005-09-17 03:30:06
2005-09-17 03:30:06

This seems like too exotic of an error to be genuine. I suggest you get a first-hand appraisal by a professional. Check out the ANACS website to see if they will be attending any shows in your area, where you can take it and get a free appraisal : http:/www.anacs.com/shows.html

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Chances are it is worth something. The question though is, was it a nickel struck on a quarter blank? Or was the nickel simply struck off-center? If it was struck on a quarter blank, the edge will have both redish brown and white. If it was struck on a nickel blank it will be a solid color. The best thing to do is take it in to several coin shops and get different opinions on what its worth. It is hard to give values for error coins sight unseen. But some coin dealers specialize in errors while others use them simply for curiosities.

The 2006 quarter is composed of a core of pure copper with outer layers of copper-nickel. If there was truly no copper then there would be no coin. If the usual copper line is missing from the edge of the quarter it is not because there is no copper in it but because as the blank quarter was stamped out of the sheet of metal, the outer layers containing the nickel were "smeared" over the edge of the blank quarter by the cutting die and concealing the customary copper band. Scraping the edge of the coin would reveal the copper.

A nickel blank planchet; nickel-$5.00 wartime silver-$350.00

The coin could not exist without the "copper filling". If you do not see the copper line on the edge of the coin it only means that the Nickel alloy has been "smeared" over it as the machine stamped out the blank planchet.

Nickel blank planchets can be found on eBay all the time selling for a couple dollars apiece. About the same price as a blank Buffalo Nickel ;>)

Check with any local coin collector for sure, but this coin can be worth a LOT of money.

This could happen if two blank planchets got into the press together, causing on to get stamped with only the heads side, and the other to get stamped with only the tails side. This is a relatively rare error, and could be worth $50 to $100 or more. This could also be a normal quarter that somebody has altered. If it weighs significantly less than 5.67 grams, then I would say that it has been altered and has no added value.

A blank planchet for a nickel is worth about $2.00

Average value of a nickel planchet is $3.00-$5.00.

blank quarter errors are worth a couple dollars to an interested collector.

Blank quarter planchet; Silver planchet-$35.00 compound planchet-$4.00

Yes, in 1965 some coins were made like that, in error, of course. A blank planchet from 1964 was stamped in 1965, resulting in a silver 1965. It's also possible that the coin was plated. Get a good scale; a silver quarter weighs about 6.25 gm while a plated copper-nickel quarter would weigh about 5.7 gm. FWIW, it wouldn't be a "misprint" though, it would be a "mis-strike". Bills are printed, coins are struck or minted.

These unstamped quarter errors generally sell for a couple dollars.

There are a few explanations (if this truly is a mint error) The first and most valuable would be a quarter struck on a nickel blank, such a coin would be worth quite a bit of money. The second most valuable would be a coin that was a clipped planchet (blank) such a coin has a cut on it, but as this can be done after minting so it is best to see a coin dealer about this. But, it is always possible this wasn't done at the mint, but was done afterwards. So you need to see a reputable coin dealer to get it evaluated in person.

A blank tile is not worth anything - it gets no score.

I've seen nickels struck on cent blanks, but not cents struck on nickel blanks -- the blanks are too large for the feeder tubes. I suggest you contact Mike Byers -- an error expert. His website is here : http://mikebyers.com

This could happen if two blank planchets got into the press together, causing one to get stamped with only the heads side, and the other to get stamped with only the tails side. This is a relatively rare error, and could be worth $50 to $100 or more. This could also be a normal nickel that somebody has altered. If it weighs significantly less than 5 grams, then I would say that it has been altered and has no added value. You can check out the ANACS website to see if they will be attending any upcoming coin shows in your area, where you can take your coin and get a free professional appraisal : http://www.anacs.com/shows.html

The coin needs to be seen for an accurate assessment, take it to a coin dealer. It could be worth as much as $30.00

I have no idea. I can't think of anything. I'm drawing a blank.

If it is a totally blank planchet, look at the edge. If it already has a raised rim like a normal quarter, it's worth about $5. However if the edge doesn't have a rim, it's worth about $10.

The mint mark position on all quarters minted since 1968 is the same - next to the tail of Washington's wig. Blank / P = Phila, D = Denver. Note that the coin you have isn't really gold. It's an ordinary copper-nickel quarter that was plated and sold by a private company as a supposed "collectible".

Anything that has mass and takes up space is called matter.


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