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Answered 2014-08-22 10:00:07

Arsenic is technically not a metal. It is considered a metalloid. Some variants of arsenic can be more metal-like than others.

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No. Arsenic is a metalloid and phosphorus is a nonmetal.


Arsenic pentaiodide (AsI5) doesn't contain any metal; arsenic is a metalloid and iodine a nonmetal.


Arsenic (symbol As) is a metalloid. It exhibits properties of both metals and non metals.


Arsenic is a metalloid. It belongs to group 15 and has properties of both metals and non metals.


Arsenic is a semi-metal. The other two are a metal and a nonmetal respectively.


Arsenic is usually classified as a metalloid. The chemistry of arsenic is predominately nonmetallic but it shows less anionic behavior than ordinary nonmetals. Liquid arsenic is a semiconductor. It can form many metal alloys but most of them are brittle.


In 1649, Johann Schröder published two methods for preparing elemental Arsenic. So the answer is Arsenic. Yahoo anwers.com


Arsenic is a metalloid, or "semi-metal". The whole reason for the special category "metalloids" is that some compounds act like metals in some ways and like non-metals in others. Asking whether they're more like metals or nonmetals depends partly on what properties in particular you're concerned with. In the case of arsenic, there are different allotropes as well. Grey arsenic, the more stable and more common form, is more metallic in character than yellow arsenic.


Lead is a poor metal and (or) a metalloid: it has some amphoteric properties as well, like bismuth or arsenic. It has some fine metallic properties though.


No, Boron (B) is classified as a metalloid, which is an element with propertyies intermediate between metals and nonmetals. Other metalloids are: Silicon, Germanium, Arsenic, Antimony, Tellurium, Polonium and Astatine.


They are half metal and half nonmetal. some examples areBoronSiliconGermaniumArsenicAntimonyTelluriumPoloniumI belive that metaloids are also called semiconductors. ENJOY!


3 The main species of arsenic found in the environment are the arsenic (III) and arsenic (V).


The only stable, and thus by far the most common, isotope of arsenic is arsenic-75, although isotopes have existed from arsenic-60 through arsenic-92. The isotopes with the longest half-lives are arsenic-73, arsenic-74, and arsenic-76.


Strictly, there are no other "chemicals" in arsenic, because arsenic is a chemical element, and pure arsenic therefore does not contain any other element.


You filter out the arsenic!How? go to what is good to filter arsenic with?


Arsenic is an element. The scientific name for arsenic is arsenic. Arsenic's chemical symbol is: As It is left to the student to balance the chemical equation of Arsenic and Old Lace.


No, arsenic is not magnetic.


There are no arsenic in a protoplasm


No Arsenic is monoatomic.


Arsenic good to give to your enemies:)Arsenic good to give to your enemies:)


Arsenic has 33 protons/electrons and 42 neutrons.


Arsenic is very toxic. Arsenic was used as poison by murderers. But some useful drugs may contain arsenic.


Yes, arsenic and most arsenic containing compounds are poisonous. Arsenic poisoning from injection, ingestion, or inhalation as well as chronic arsenic poisoning can be fatal. Arsenic notably interrupts ATP production, inhibits the production of enzymes in the organs, and is a carcinogen. Depending on how the arsenic is introduced to the body and how much the symptoms of arsenic poisoning varies widely.


Yes, arsenic and most arsenic containing compounds are poisonous. Arsenic poisoning from injection, ingestion, or inhalation as well as chronic arsenic poisoning can be fatal. Arsenic notably interrupts ATP production, inhibits the production of enzymes in the organs, and is a carcinogen. Depending on how the arsenic is introduced to the body and how much the symptoms of arsenic poisoning varies widely.



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