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Is it legal for an apartment owner to raise your rent after 2 months even though you signed a year lease?

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2011-09-13 02:43:41
2011-09-13 02:43:41

READ YOUR LEASE. Line by line to see if it allows an increase during the TERM of the lease.

You should also look in the local telephone directory for a free LEGAL AID clinic, where you can consult with a lawyer for free , about your rights in the matter. There may be laws in your state that require advance notice of a rent increase, or other legal remedies that you can use. Get educated about your rights, quickly.

AnswerReading ANY agreement throughly is excellent advice, although it would be better for most consumer's if they took such action before making a commitment. It is somewhat ridiculous to expect the average consumer to read the entire contractual agreement and understand all the legal "mumbo-jumbo", however one should make their best effort to do so. Lenders/landlords know that only about one in fifty people actually read what they are signing, and often put in provisions that have never been fully explained. There are "Uncertainty Principle" laws that one can use as a valid defensive tactic in many such situations. Consulting the state statutes or contacting the state Housing Authority might provide more specific information. AnswerI was thinking in terms of the jurisdiction in which I live.

Here in Ontario, Canada, we have the "plain language law " that has completely changed the way in which contracts and leases are worded. They have to be understandable by the "average person" not a Philadelphia lawyer.

We also have a Provincial tenants and Landlords Act that sets out exactly what each side can and cannot do in a rental situation, and that office is available 24/7 by a 1 800 toll free line.

It is so much easier to do rental business in this country, where we have only 10 Provinces, instead of 50 states, each with it's own separate set of laws to contend with.

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No. An apartment lease is a legal document and can only be signed by a legal adult (18 years old minimum in the U.S.A.). Possibly, the lessor might allow the apartment lease to be co-signed with an adult as a guarantor.

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if it says in your lease that they can - did you read it before you signed it ??

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He signed a two year lease for his first apartment.

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Depending on the lease or the apartment Depending on the lease or the apartment Depending on the lease or the apartment

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You are legally bound to the lease and the obligations of the original contract as if it were your lease. You can take the person that you co-signed for to court for reimbursement.

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Move out of the apartment, let them keep your deposit. Or you can, with the landlord's permission, assign the lease to someone else to take over.

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There is no "cooling off period' for leases and rental contracts.

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The natural demise of the lease is grounds for eviction. The process varies by state.

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They can ask, and some people might do it, but you don't have to, unless the deposit is written into the lease.

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You can get out of a lease but there is always a penalty. Usually you have to pay aat least a months rent plus an additional charge. Some properties can charge you for the rest of the lease. That means if you have six months left on your lease then you owe six months rent!

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I am living in an apartment community in Costa Mesa. This is a big apartment community owner, and have hundreds of apartment communities. I am moving to a different state and wanted to check what would be the consequences if: - I don't pay the lease break fee and move out - I don't pay the apartment community the discount (two months' rent off) that they gave when I signed the lease for 15 months Will they be able to: - Freeze my bank accounts - Hold/seize on my federal tax return - File a criminal case against me? Please let me know

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This depends on the terms of your lease. Read the fine print. Many (most) apartment complexes have clauses the lease which give the owner the authority to make changes like this whenever they want. The only legal ground you would have against something like that would be if they moved you into an apartment which was demonstrably of lower quality, smaller, or did not have features which you paid extra for. For example, if you paid extra for a ground-floor or handicapped accessible apartment.

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Yes, because you co-signed you signed a contract stating that you will guarantee that funds are paid if he cannot. The apartment complex can actually sue both of you because of the legal and binding contract that you both signed. We have to be very careful when we put our names and credit at risk for those we love.

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This will all depend upon what the contract says. If you signed a contract, you may be held to the lease or have to pay the penalty within the contract.

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It means if an apartment rent is $500 and they rent you the apartment for $550, the apartments have a $50 gain to lease. If they rent it for $450, they have a $50 loss to lease.

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Yes, a lease is a signed contract

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Compensation should be made for the problem, but if the lease is signed, it is in force. Check with your state for the possible remedies you have for failure to have a habitable place.

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Yes, it is possible to get evicted if you signed a lease that does not allow cats. You will be given the option to rehome your cat, find a new apartment, or get evicted. If you signed a lease that says it allows cats (and you've paid the deposit / pet rent if applicable), then you can't be evicted.

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If u pay first and last but didn't sign a lease or didn't move in can u get full payment back

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They can change conditions upon renewal. Not sure if they can do this if it is not on the lease. Read your lease: it may be that they failed to collect it at the time.

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This depends upon whether that fee is quoted on your lease when you signed it. It is not there, then landlord cannot charge you because he rented the apartment quickly after you left. However he may be able to keep your security deposit if you broke your lease. If there was a lease, the terms are generally such that you are responsible for the rent for any month that the apartment is vacant from the time you vacate the apartment to the time the lease ends OR the apartment is rented out, whichever comes first. Since the landlord did not suffer any damage by breaking the lease - he rented out the unit just a few days that you left - there shouldn't really be any reason for him to charge a fee. But if that is stated on your lease then he has the right to do so.


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