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Answered 2016-11-03 23:36:59

No. The surface gravity of a planet depends on its size and mass, not its distance from the sun.

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When there is less gravity, there is less gas is this true or false



Well sometimes it is and sometimes it isn't. That old saying is not nessary true. Because there are plenty of planets in the universe that are the same size as earth but have less gravity than earth.


It's true that gravity holds planets in orbit. However, this is due to the gravitational influence of the sun, not the gravitational influence of other planets.


The sun does indeed keep the orbits of the planets and other celestial objects in place because of its gravity.


That's one of Kepler's three laws of planetary motion, which he figured out fromstudying Tycho's lifetime of watching the planets and keeping notes.About 100 years after Kepler, Newton wrote his theory of universal gravitation,and showed that if gravity is true, then the planets mustbehave that way.The best direct answer to your question is: Because that's how gravity works.


No, that's not true. All planets, moons, and stars have gravity. Actually all objects have gravity, it's just not very strong for small objects.


Yes it is because because hte closer they are the greater the force.


Gravity is stronger on some planets because the planet's core is much more dense. Making it's gravitational pull stronger. Which is making gravity stronger. that is sortof true


well that's true but the sun uses cavity to keep the planets in the correct orbit


No, planets actually move more slowly the further out they are. This is because the Sun's gravity decreases with distance, so planets need less velocity to maintain their orbits at greater distances.


No. Becase Mars is smaller and less dense than Earth it has less mass and therefore less gravity.


Yes. However, it does so less than the Moon's gravity.


That's one of Kepler's three laws of planetary motion, which he figured out fromstudying Tycho's lifetime of watching the planets and keeping notes.About 100 years after Kepler, Newton wrote his theory of universal gravitation,and showed that if gravity is true, then the planets mustbehave that way.The best direct answer to the question is: Because that's how gravity works.



That's one of Kepler's three laws of planetary motion, which he figured out fromstudying Tycho's lifetime of watching the planets and keeping notes.About 100 years after Kepler, Newton wrote his theory of universal gravitation,and showed that if gravity is true, then the planets mustbehave that way.


because some planets are closer to the sun than others and there are various other reasons and some may not be true


I'd imagine it's because they have less distance to travel to get around the sun. Draw yourself a dot as the sun then draw the size of the circle the close planet would have to travel to orbit the sun. Now draw the circle in the size the planet further away would have to travel. Make sense? --- That's partly true, the other reason why the planet closer orbits faster is because the closer the planet is to the Sun the stronger the gravitation force is, so the Sun pulls harder. --- Imagine it more as how fast you have to travel to not fall in to the Sun. Imagine yourself as the planet and the force of gravity pulling you into the planet. You have to travel fast enough so that the gravitational pull from the Sun doesn't pull you in. Gravity gets stronger on a squared rule the closer you get to on object, more gravity means you have to travel faster. The closer you are the faster you must go to maintain orbit. Only when the force of gravity and the speed you are travelling at are ballanced will you orbit, any slower and you crash into the Sun any faster and you fly out into space.


There is no doubt that planets, stars, and solar systems could not ever have formed without gravity. All of these astronomical objects condensed out of clouds of interstellar gas and dust, under the influence of gravity. It is also true that planets orbit stars only because of the gravitational attraction of those stars.


Yes. That's one of Kepler's three laws of planetary motion, which he figured outfrom studying Tycho's lifetime of watching the planets and keeping notes.About 100 years after Kepler, Newton wrote his theory of universal gravitation,and showed that if gravity is true, then the planets mustbehave that way.


Yes and No.More massive planets have a stronger gravitational pull. Often larger planets are more massive than smaller ones, but that does not always have to be true! You can have a large planet with a low density.Size, as the distance across the planet's diameter, has a small inverse effect on the gravitational pull of the planet - the gravity is lower further away from the "center of gravity" which in the case of a planet is at the center of the (almost) spherical body.


The gravity is greater the nearer to Earth you go. The same is true for all planets.


No. Mercury is closer than Venus but Venus is hotter. Otherwise, the assertion is true.


the moons orbit the planet but the planets orbit the sunMoons revolve round planets. Planets revolve round suns.___________AlternateThe truth is that planets orbit round their moons, or more precisely a planet and its moon(s) orbit around their barycenter, the center of gravity of the planet-moon system. This is true for the earth, but this orbital motion of earth is less noticeable than the orbital motion of the smaller moon. I think the real difference between planets and their moons is relative size.


Sort of a Meteor is a part of an Asteroid, but it starts to burn up in entering the earths atmosphere



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