answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2007-12-05 02:34:29
2007-12-05 02:34:29

Depends on your insurance provider. You'll have to contact your agent or the company through customer service to find out what your insurance policy covers. It'll also be on your policy if you have it. Some insurance policies automatically cover infrequent drivers, others only cover primary insured. If your child is a regular driver of the vehicle, you will need to add them to the insurance at additional cost.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


It depends on the wording of the policy, but if the policy was a family policy it would not normally cover adult children (normally those 18 or over would be adult) and thus it is unlikely that a 19year old would be covered. The 19year old would need separate health insurance cover of his/her own.


It depends, but the terms are NOT interchangeable. The guarantor is the person or entity financially responsible for the bill. The subscriber is the person who carries the insurance. Example of when they are the same person: An adult carries their own insurance policy (subscriber). They are also financially responsible to pay the charges they incur for the doctor's visit (guarantor). Charges include non-covered services or share of cost such the deductible, copay, or co-insurance. Example of when they are a different person: Adult 1 (father) carries a family insurance policy (subscriber). Adult 2 (son, a college student) is covered under Adult 1's policy. Adult 2 is responsible for their share of cost (such as copays and coinsurance or anything that isn't covered under the insurance policy).




This is a question best answered by your insurance agent or a call to your insurance company's 800 customer service phoneline.A bit more:Unless the insurance regulations have changed since I was a licensed auto and homeowners insurance agent: If your child is of legal adult age and not living with you, then no, you don't add him to your policy. Actually, many insurance companies wouldn't allow you to include an adult child (or any other adult) who does not live with you to your auto insurance policy.


No, they are not old enough to sign a contract such as an insurance policy. They will require an adult to obtain the policy for them.


No, since there is no medical necessity of circumcision it is often not covered by insurance.


A parent or other adult can purchase insurance for a minor. A minor might not be able to make the payments on a policy.




The spouse, the children, and any covered adult dependent.



Once you're married, you're legally considered an emancipated adult and would not be covered by your parents' insurance. You would be covered by your spouse's insurance.


No. As there is no insurable interest between brother & sister it is not possible to take a policy on an adult brother by his sister.


If your parents took out a life insurance policy and paid for it, the policy belongs to them and even if you are the person whose life is insured, that does not give you rights over that policy. I am not entirely sure why your parents would feel the need to have life insurance for their adult progeny, but possibly they are concerned that if you were to suffer a tragic premature death, they would be stuck with funeral expenses that they could not afford to pay unless they had an insurance policy to help them.


As long as she has her own policy on her own, it would not affect your insurance in the sense of premium or the need to have her insured on your policy. However, most auto insurance company want to have her listed as a driver in the household since she lives with you. The policy actually follow the vehicle and not the driver. If she was to drive this vehicle and get into an accident, your policy would be the primary and her policy would be secondary.


A life insurance policy is a legal contract and is binding. Therefor unless there is fraud, there is nothing to contest.


Check this page for the answer http://www.steveshorr.com/law_relating_to_insurance.htm primary policy will be medicare&secondary will bethe patient's commercial insurance company.as medicare covers all.the remaining which is not allowable wiill be covered by secondary


Your dad can withdraw the cash value of your life insurance policy if he is the policy owner of your policy. If you have obtained adulthood, you dad cannot withdraw the cash value of your life insurance policy without your consent. If you are minor life assured, your dad as proposer can draw cash value on maturity,provided you will not be adult then.


No. Absolutely not. You cannot insure a vehicle that you do not own. The only exemption of this is if the owner and insured are married and live together or a dependent child living at home. Most companies want an adult child to have their own insurance policy even if they live with you. Call your agent and ask to be sure.


If the child is over age 18, then the parent is not responsible for the child's medical bills. The child is legally responsible for anything that the insurance policy did not pay.


No, such as 'roomates' and adult non-relatives. Refer to page one of your actual policy; Definitions. An insured means you and residents of your household who are; a. your relatives or b. other persons under age 21 in care of any person named above Maybe this depends on your policy. The policies I've seen in California covered people with fire damage like this: If you have a room mate that is actually paying rent, then no... they need their own renters policy. If you have another adult non-relative (such as a live-in-lover) and they do NOT pay rent, then they are covered.


Yes. Normally you have to own a vehicle to insure it. You cannot purchase insurance on a vehicle that you do not own with a few exceptions. The exceptions deal with a family household situation. Vehicles titled to a husband or wife may be insured on the policy of either one and the same thing applies to children living in the home as a car titled in an adult child's name may be added to the insurance policy of the parents.


A 16-year-old is not legally able to contract with the insurance company unless he has been emancipated. Which leaves him to work with his parents or another adult to acquire the insurance.


Yes, an insured and a beneficiary have to have an insurable interest to be able to have a life insurance policy. Parents/children are considered to have insurable interest



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.