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Is the beneficiary obligated to pay decease debt?

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2015-06-28 22:10:49
2015-06-28 22:10:49

I'm confused... Your the benficiary of what? Life Insurance or a Will? The deceased left debts...and taxes? If you are the beneficiary of a life insurance policy...the proceeds go to you..in full (after paying back any loans taken against the policy), no matter what. Independent of the "estate" of the deceased. If your a beneficiary as in a Will of the decedent...then his bills of whatever type get paid before whatever your supposed to get is available. (If he owes other people they must get paid. It kind of makes sense that he can't leave you money he doesn't really have).

Answer2:

No. Any debts are paid out of the estate left by the deceased. If the estate is not large enough to cover the debts it ends there. The beneficiary gets nothing but does not assume the debts.

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