answersLogoWhite
Television and Video
HDTV
Home Electricity
English Spelling and Pronunciation

Is there a way to fix the color on a television?


Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
2008-03-30 18:53:40
2008-03-30 18:53:40

"Fixing" the color of TV is a bit vague. What's wrong with the color? There are some things that can be done, and some that can't. If the color is "off" and things are wack, there could be a handful of things that might contribute to the set's performance. Let's look at some. The (color) picture tube (the cathode ray tube, or CRT) has three electron guns in the back. They're all sealed inside the tube, and they stay there for the life of that tube. The cathode of the gun "wears out" after a while and it cannot support demands for "electron production" and high beam current. The cathodes of the guns are the same, but they can age a bit differently, and the supporting electronics may need to be adjusted to restore what is called the color balance. Certainly the beams should be adjusted so they run pretty much equally. But there are limits to how far up one can turn the "drives" without the color in the picture "bleeding" outside the edges of images. If the emission of one of the guns is "too low" and it can't be driven hard enough to create the nice, bright picture one wants, it might be possible to "restore" the cathode. In this process, a technician with what is called a CRT rejuvenator can "overdrive" the cathodes a bit in an attempt to get a bit more life out of the cathode, and, thereby, the CRT. But most shops don't like to do this because the process can damage the CRT and make it unusable. Plus, it may not work. It's not cost effective for them to burn time on this, even if they have the piece of gear it takes to perform the task. Let's look at some other stuff. It may be that the set has lost some of its convergence. What that means is that the beams aren't all "tracking" the same pixels at the same time. Convergence is something that a technician adjusts by connecting a piece of equipment (a "pattern generator") to the set that generates several different test pictures that can be used to line things up. The convergence magnets are tweaked to make things right. (In a few sets, the technician might have to actually go a bit farther to try to get the convergence back.) By the way, anyone who starts adjusting the convergence magnets without the equipment or the knowledge to competently set the CRT up usually makes things worse and can't get them back to the place where the adjustments were begun. A combination of these factors (and perhaps one or two other things) may be behind the need to "fix the color" of a TV. In this day and age, the set is probably at the end of its life. CRT's can be rebuilt, but almost no one does it any more. It's not cost effective to do that like is used to be. And it's not cost effective to buy a new CRT, either. New sets are dirt cheap. And that's the CRT TV's. How about a new flat screen? Or a good used set from a TV shop or thrift store? They're available to those on a budget. If you're stuck with a TV that isn't performing well and you're on a budget, start looking at the thrift stores, and the second hand stores. Check with some TV shops to see if they have some unclaimed repairs they're selling. If you're flush, treat yourself to a new set. Make it a fun adventure. Hang out in the stores for a bit and get an education. (Do not buy the first thing you see or are shown.) And donate your old set to a non-profit. Please don't toss it in the dumpster. The land fills don't need the extra junk. Good luck resolving your difficulties.

Related Questions

User Avatar

You just have to grab it by the hair and doggy style it until you get the right color you want

User Avatar

When Color Televisions first came out and Televisions were still available without color, they would be advertised that way for sale.

User Avatar

Carl Babcoke has written: 'A new way to service color TV' -- subject(s): Color television, Repairing

User Avatar

The Fix - TV film - was created in 1997.


Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.