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Answered 2013-05-10 06:08:26

There are 3 parts of plan of the Medicare Advantage Plan. The original plans are Medicare Part A (hospital and insurance) and B (medical insurance). The third is named Medicare+Choice Part C which includes additional services.

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Humana Gold Choice is more comprehensive than some Medicare supplemental plans, but it really depends on the plan. Humana Gold Choice is a Medicare Advantage plan that offers the same benefits as the original Medicare plan except that it is a PFFS, Private Fee-for-Service, plan. However, plans like Medicare Supplemental Plan G and Medicare Supplemental Plan F offer more comprehensive benefits than the Humana Gold Choice plan.


If you are eligible for Medicare, you may want to look into a Medicare Advantage Plan. This is a plan administered by a private insurance company who has a contract with Medicare. They must offer everything Medicare offers, but most Advantage plans offer above and beyond what Medicare allows. Each Advantage plan is different, it is definitely worth looking into if you feel you have needs that Medicare won't meet adequately.


It depends on the person and the treatment that will be sought, but in general Medicare Advantage does come out to be slightly cheaper than traditional Medicare. One must keep in mind that Medicare covers some non-medicine plans not covered by Medicare Advantage.


A Medicare Replacement Plan is synonomous with the names Medicare Part C, Medicare+Choice, and Medicare Advantage. In general, what these have in common is that the member gets a wider range of benefits (sometimes including Rx benefits), and often lower copayments than with regular Medicare. What must be kept in mind, however, is that not all medical providers accept all plans, so it is important to check with your providers before enrolling to make sure that it will be worthwhile for you. You must have Medicare A & B to enroll in such a plan, and there may be an additional premium. Therefore, there will be a cost-benefit analysis.


A Medicare Advantage Plan basically replaces your use of Traditional Medicare. You still must pay your Medicare Part B premium that is automatically deducted from your Social Security check, that will not stop when you purchase the Medicare Advantage Plan though there are plans have may reimburse a portion of your Part B Premium. The following types of Medicare Advantage plans are available, but not always available depending on your county and state of residence:HMOPros can be zero or very low cost to you per month, predictable co-pays like $10.00 or $15.00 for doctor's office visits, and lower cost hosptilization than Traditional Medicare, no deductibles, and most will include your Medicare Part D Prescription Plan. Cons can be a restricted network of doctors that you must use, no maximum out of pocket limits, and some plans may resort to the old "referrals" to see a specialist.PPOPros can be low cost to you per month, predictable co-pays like $15.00 or $20.00 for doctor's office visits, you can go in or out of network, no deductibles when you stay in network, no referrals for specialist, lower cost hosptilization than Traditional Medicare, an established maximum out of pocket, and most will include your Medicare Part D Prescription Plan. Cons can be if you do go out of network you'll pay a deductible first before the cost is split by a percentage between you and the insurance company.PFFSThis is a "Private Fee For Services" Plan. First the Cons: The single most important thing to remember about PFFS is the fact that you must contact the doctor or hospital FIRST to see if they take the plan. Even before you make an appointment to see a doctor, the doctor must tell you that they do indeed accept the terms and conditions of the plan. The doctor also has the choice not to accept the plan on a per visit basis. Meaning, the doctor may accept the terms and conditions on the first visit, but may not on the second.The pros are similar to the PPO, it works basically the same. The monthly premiums are typically higher than the PPO, but less than adding a supplement.ONE MORE THING!Now, there are pros and cons when comparing the Medicare Advantage Plans to Traditional Medicare with Medigap, or a Medicare Supplement attached to it. Medigap, also called a Medicare Supplement, basically pays the portion of medical expenses that Medicare expects you to pay. Medicare is an "80/20" plan, meaning Medicare pays 80% of the bill and you pay 20% of the bill. Medigap can pay the 20% for you. Depending on which Medigap plan you choose, the plan can also pay the (2009) $1068.00 hositalization deductible for you and the $135.00 doctor's office deductible for you. The only problem with Medigap is the monthly premiums range anywhere between $120.00/month to $300.00/month and they do not include drug coverage. Here's the latest publication from Medicare that explains some more details at links:


Anyone who does not have Medicare Part A and/or Part B cannot enroll in a standalone Part d plan. or; If you have enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan, other than a PFFS plan you cannot enroll in a stand alone part d plan. or; If you are outside the enrollment periods of November 15th - December 31st of each year you cannot enroll without a special election period.


Unfortunately, Medicare does not pay 100% of expenses for surgeries, whether inpatient or outpatient. If you are on a fixed income and healthcare is too expensive, you may want to look into Medical Assistance. Another option is to look into local Medicare Advantage plans - often they offer more than regular Medicare for just slightly more money than Medicare.


If you have a Medicare Supplement then the provider will bill Original Medicare first. At that time Medicare will pay the allowable amount and then return an explanation of benefits stating the beneficiary's portion. Based on the Medicare Supplement Plan that is in place (A-N) the Medicare Supplement will pay a portion or all of the remaining amount due. If they pay only a portion based on the plan (A-N), then according the plan guidelines, the beneficiary would pay any outstanding amount at that time. If a Medicare beneficiary is covered on a employer or retiree group plan and due to the size of the plan, the group plan is primary, then the group plan benefits will apply first and any amounts due by the Beneficiary will be billed to Medicare second. If it is a Medicare covered service, then Medicare will pay the remaining amount due as the secondary payor up to the amount allowed by Medicare. If the service is not allowed by Medicare, than the beneficiary's co-insurance or co-payment under the group plan would be their responsibility.


This refers to insurance plans, called "Advantage Private-Fee-for-Service" plans, that one buys to accompany their Medicare since Medicare does not cover all costs (neither do these insurance plans). Many of these Advantage PFFS plans have a zero premium, hence they are called "no cost". They can offer a zero premium because this type of plan receives compensation from Medicare directly to provide coverage; in essence, Medicare is paying the monthly premium rather than the participant.


You can apply for Medicare 3 months prior to your 65th birthday, the month of your birthday, and 3 months following your 65th birthday. Check out this page for information on Medicare: http://www.medicare.gov/Publications/Pubs/pdf/10050.pdf You should also know that the 2011 Medicare open enrollment dates are quite a bit different than in 2010. (This is the period when you can switch from Original Medicare to Medicare Advantage and vice versa ... or switch between Medicare Advantage plans.)


This refers to the case in which a patient is insured by more than one insurance plan. For example, a Medicare patient is generally covered for 80% of charges for a physician visit. In this case , he or she would usually be responsible for the remaining 20% of charges. However, if he or she has dual insurance coverage and is also covered by a supplemental plan. Medicare plus, this secondary plan would generally pay the amount not covered by the patient's primary insurance plan, Medicare.


AnswerWhen you are on a private health plan.AnswerIt's much more complicated than that. The most common reason is that you're not retired so your employer is prime.


The "best" Medicare coverage depends on your individual medical needs. In other words the best plan for you may be a bad plan for someone else. Medicare regulates the plans offered by the companies, so no company is really better than another. As far as the "cheapest" there is competition between companies on prices, but it really depends on the county and state where your reside, and what type of plan you choose as to what your actual cost will be.A Medicare Advantage Plan basically replaces your use of Traditional Medicare. You still must pay your Medicare Part B premium that is automatically deducted from your Social Security check, that will not stop when you purchase the Medicare Advantage Plan. The following types of Medicare Advantage plans are available, but not always available depending on your county and state of residence:HMOPros can be zero or very low cost to you per month, predictable co-pays like $10.00 or $15.00 for doctor's office visits, and lower cost hosptilization than Traditional Medicare, no deductibles, and most will include your Medicare Part D Prescription Plan. Cons can be a restricted network of doctors that you must use, no maximum out of pocket limits, and some plans may resort to the old "referrals" to see a specialist.PPOPros can be low cost to you per month, predictable co-pays like $15.00 or $20.00 for doctor's office visits, you can go in or out of network, no deductibles when you stay in network, no referrals for specialist, lower cost hosptilization than Traditional Medicare, an established maximum out of pocket, and most will include your Medicare Part D Prescription Plan. Cons can be if you do go out of network you'll pay a deductible first before the cost is split by a percentage between you and the insurance company.PFFSThis is a "Private Fee For Services" Plan. First the Cons: The single most important thing to remember about PFFS is the fact that you must contact the doctor or hospital FIRST to see if they take the plan. Even before you make an appointment to see a doctor, the doctor must tell you that they do indeed accept the terms and conditions of the plan.The pros are similar to the PPO, it works basically the same. The monthly premiums are typically higher than the PPO, but less than adding a supplement.ONE_MORE_THING!">ONE MORE THING!Now, there are pros and cons when comparing the Medicare Advantage Plans to Traditional Medicare with Medigap, or a Medicare Supplement attached to it. Medigap, also called a Medicare Supplement, basically pays the portion of medical expenses that Medicare expects you to pay. Medicare is an "80/20" plan, meaning Medicare pays 80% of the bill and you pay 20% of the bill. Medigap can pay the 20% for you. Depending on which Medigap plan you choose, the plan can also pay the (2009) $1068.00 hositalization deductible for you and the $135.00 doctor's office deductible for you. Medigap plans have a monthly premium range anywhere between $80.00/month to $300.00/month, depending on your zip code.Medicare Supplement Plan F is considered "the Cadillac plan" as it covers almost everything that Medicare, itself, does not cover. This is also the most expensive Medigap plan.Medicare Supplement Plan G is often 10% lower in cost than Plan F and is exactly the same as F, except that the member must first pay their Medicare Part B deductible each year when seeing the physician for the first time. For 2011, this deductible is $162 for the year. The savings for going with Plan G are often in the $150 to $300 per year range. This means that Plan G is often the best choice for value.Medigap (Medicare Supplement) plans are all standardized, meaning that they are the same, exact, plans from company to company. The only difference is the amount of premium each company charges for the same coverages. Claims cannot be individually denied and are paid based on whether or not they were Medicare-approved claims. That is the only criteria.


As long as the only reason you are covered by Medicare is because of a disability and you haven't reached the minimum age Medicare requires to become eligible naturally, then the number of members in the group health plan will determine who is primary or secondary. Group plans with fewer than 100 members are considered to be "small" businesses and Medicare would be primary. Conversely, "large" businesses (more than 100 members) will be primary over Medicare. It doesn't matter whether the group plan is provided by you or your spouse. At the time you reach Medicare's required age to naturally become eligible with them, your case will be reviewed. At that point, the group size doesn't matter. If you have other coverage provided by you or your spouse, it will always be primary over Medicare. Medicare won't become primary until both you and your spouse have retired and are no longer covered by a group health plan. Medicare supplement plans are always secondary to Medicare, but then those aren't group health plans.


The benefits of purchasing an AARP Medicare supplement are many. This supplemental insurance plan offers extra coverage above what Medicare covers, deductibles are lower, and there are more service providers who accept this supplemental insurance than other similar plans through other companies.


It depends, if your employer has less than 20 employees...then yes. If not, then you have the option to use the employer plan, Medicare, or both.


Medicare supplement pays part or all of your deductibles and copays that you have with Medicare parts A and B. A "Medicare replacement" is actually Medicare advantage. They are a Medicare option that combines your Part A, B and sometimes part D into one plan that is administered by a Medicare contracted insurance company. Many of these plans have very low or even 0 monthly premiums. You still have copays but they are generally much less than Original Medicare. (If this question relates to United States Medicare, there is no such thing as the concept of "Medicare replacement." I do not see anywhere to add an alternative answer so I put this here just as a warning. In the United States you are either on Medicare or you are not. If you are on Medicare in the United States, you will almost certainly feel the need to supplement it. Over 95% of the people on United States Medicare supplement it in some way. There is a wide choice of ways to supplement United States Medicare. The answer above describes only two of them.


It the wife has her husband on her work insurance plan than that is his primary insurance. If he is not covered on her plan then he would need to buy his own insurance. Once he gets on Medicare that would become his primary insurance. If his wife is still working once he gets on Medicare the primary carrier is determined by how many people work for her company. If there are less than 100 employees then Medicare would be primary.


A mechanical advantage greater than one means you can perform more work than the effort you expend. The mechanical advantage gives you more capability. A mechanical advantage of only 1 means you really do not have any advantage.


One thing to remember about Medicare is that it is an individual plan. If you are on Medicare due to disability, that is your Medicare plan alone and your spouse would need to qualify on her own. Unless she has certain disabilities, your spouse would need to be turning 65 to qualify for Medicare. Check the link below to see about eligibility: http://www.medicare.gov/MedicareEligibility/home.asp?version=default&browser=IE%7C7%7CWindows+Vista&language=English


In the United States, there are many Medicare beneficiaries who find themselves in need of Medicare supplemental insurance to cover certain health care needs that are not adequately covered by Medicare. Also known as Medigap, these private forms of health insurance are considered essential for many citizens who depend upon Medicare, particular those who happen to have serious preexisting conditions. Medicare supplemental insurance currently plays a very important role in the health care industry. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20% of current Medicare beneficiaries are now paying for some form of Medicare supplemental insurance. Here is an inside look at the world of Medigap that can help you figure out what kind of Medicare supplemental insurance is right for you. In order to enroll in a true Medigap program, it is necessary for an individual to qualify for Medicare assistance. Just like any health insurance program, there is a period of open enrollment for Medicare supplemental insurance that a citizen needs to take advantage of. In the case of Medicare supplemental insurance, an individual needs to apply for a Medicare supplemental insurance plan within six months of becoming eligible for Medicare. For most citizens of the United States, this means that a person needs to find the right Medigap program for him or her within six months of his or her 65th birthday. Thankfully, consumers can now rest assured that Medicare supplemental insurance plans have been approved by professional organizations. In order to be considered a Medicare supplement insurance plan, it is necessary for a provider to be approved by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, also known as CMS. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services have organized Medicare supplement insurance plans into a dozen different categories that make finding the right Medigap plan for you easier than ever. It is important to shop around when it comes to approved Medicare supplement plans, as some Medigap plans can actually be more expensive that a full service health insurance plan. Nevertheless, there are some excellent Medicare supplemental insurance plans available provided that you are willing to put in the time and energy necessary to find the Medigap plan that you need.


Humana Gold Plus HMO plans include all original medicare benefits. Also, it is a fixed cost plan and is more pridictable than basic Medicare. Humana Gold Plus HMO has predictible expenses such as fixed copays and precription drug coverage. In addition most yearly and well exams are covered at no cost.


During your working life, you pay Medicare tax out of your paycheck. That tax pays for your Part A Medicare, which is the hospitalization portion of Medicare. Then when you enroll in Medicare, you can purchase Medicare Part B which is the medical/doctor's office portion of Medicare. When you purchase Part B, it is automatically deducted from your Social Security check each month. This amount will normally be $96.40(for 2009) unless you make more than $85,000.00 per year, then you will pay more for the monthly premium.


"A plan where the government pays out more money than it takes in with taxes"


If your father is 55 and retired, he is more than likely eligible to receive Medicare benefits. Seniors 55 and over are eligible and within the age range to receive premium Medicare coverage from the federal government.