Children and the Law
Child Support

Is there somewere to go to online to find out the status of your parental rights status?

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2004-12-06 13:38:27
2004-12-06 13:38:27

Probably not. If the person owes a considerable amount to the state for the care of a child there might be a way to recover funds. Those woiuld go to the state itself, and not the custodia parent. It is not likely however, unless the person has major assets that could be seized without costly legal procedure. Support generally ends between the ages of 18-21, depending on the state. The statute of limitations varies as well. Got to this excellent website for your particular state. http://www.child-support-collections.com/statute-of-limitations.html

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Not at all. Terminating parental rights is a court process by which you either voluntarily relinquish your parental rights or there is serious danger posed to your child such that the court does it without your consent. Either way, when parental rights are terminated, the parent has no more rights to the child. Losing custody can be a temporary thing and does not change your parental status.


Yes since immigration status has no bearing on parental rights.



The answer to this kind of question depends on the details such as the marital status of the parties, whether there is a current custody order and/or visitation order and whether the father has any parental rights. If he has no parental rights then the mother can move. Otherwise she must get legal advice from a professional who has reviewed all the pertinent details of the situation.The answer to this kind of question depends on the details such as the marital status of the parties, whether there is a current custody order and/or visitation order and whether the father has any parental rights. If he has no parental rights then the mother can move. Otherwise she must get legal advice from a professional who has reviewed all the pertinent details of the situation.The answer to this kind of question depends on the details such as the marital status of the parties, whether there is a current custody order and/or visitation order and whether the father has any parental rights. If he has no parental rights then the mother can move. Otherwise she must get legal advice from a professional who has reviewed all the pertinent details of the situation.The answer to this kind of question depends on the details such as the marital status of the parties, whether there is a current custody order and/or visitation order and whether the father has any parental rights. If he has no parental rights then the mother can move. Otherwise she must get legal advice from a professional who has reviewed all the pertinent details of the situation.


Yes. His immigration status bear no significance when it comes to parental rights.


He can but I doubt he will get it since immigration status has no bearing on custody and parental rights..


Yes very likely since immigration status has no bearing on parental rights.


You are still the father and have all your parental rights. Those rights and obligations don't change due to marital status. You also have the right to be slapped by either of the ladies involved.


Parental rights go with the biology. Parenthood has nothing to do with marital status. The only way that would be affected is if custody is legally granted to another person-and that can always be challanged. Remember there are two parents involved. So if there is conflict, the rights of each bio parent are equally important. If there is any concern over parental rights, the smart thing to do is contact an attorney immediately and make sure you are within whatever rights you claim to have.


You haven't provided any details about marital status and existing parental rights.If he doesn't presently have parental rights and custody- the answer is no. If the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally and petitioned the court for custody and won. The school should not allow the father to take the child. The principal should call the mother to notify her of the situation. The state where the child lives has jurisdiction over that child.If the father had no parental rights the mother should contact the police immediately.You haven't provided any details about marital status and existing parental rights.If he doesn't presently have parental rights and custody- the answer is no. If the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally and petitioned the court for custody and won. The school should not allow the father to take the child. The principal should call the mother to notify her of the situation. The state where the child lives has jurisdiction over that child.If the father had no parental rights the mother should contact the police immediately.You haven't provided any details about marital status and existing parental rights.If he doesn't presently have parental rights and custody- the answer is no. If the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally and petitioned the court for custody and won. The school should not allow the father to take the child. The principal should call the mother to notify her of the situation. The state where the child lives has jurisdiction over that child.If the father had no parental rights the mother should contact the police immediately.You haven't provided any details about marital status and existing parental rights.If he doesn't presently have parental rights and custody- the answer is no. If the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally and petitioned the court for custody and won. The school should not allow the father to take the child. The principal should call the mother to notify her of the situation. The state where the child lives has jurisdiction over that child.If the father had no parental rights the mother should contact the police immediately.



I don't see why the mother's marital status would be a barrier. However, keep in mind that signing over one's parental rights does not terminate a child support obligation.


Immigration status has no influence on parental rights but you have to prove paternity in court by a DNA test to get them. Then you can also petition to sign the birth certificate.



It depends on marital status. If married, parents have equal parental rights. If unmarried, the mother has custody and the father must establish his paternity legally. Once established he can request joint custody and visitations.


Immigration status has no influence on parental rights but you have to prove paternity in court by a DNA test to get them. Then you can also petition to sign the birth certificate and to get custody, visitation and pay child support.


No, custodial rights to minor children are a civil matter and under the jurisdiction of the state of residence. Regardless of the legal status of the mother, she still has legal rights to her biological child unless a court rules otherwise. Likewise, an unmarried female, regardless of her legal status, is presumed by law to retain sole custodial rights to the child until the father establishes parentage and is awarded joint or full custody by the court or refused custodial rights.


No you are not able to check the Jafza visa status online. You can however apply for a visa online.


Immigration status has no bearing on issues such as parental rights and responsibilities in the United States. What does matter is prevailing law where the child legally resides. Since you have not provided the state (or country) in question, an accurate answer cannot be provide.


Courts generally try to do what they think is best for the child in such cases, however, the son-in-law has parental rights, regardless of his Visa status. Unless he gives up his parental rights, or is found by a court to be an unfit parent, it is unlikely that a grandparent will be given custody of the child.


You should consult with an attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation and explain your status, rights and options.You should consult with an attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation and explain your status, rights and options.You should consult with an attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation and explain your status, rights and options.You should consult with an attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation and explain your status, rights and options.


The best option is to consult with a attorney that practices family law. Or a web search can be done of the state statutes pertaining to visitation, custodial rights, support and so forth. This type of laws are sometimes difficult to interpret without help from someone who is knowledgeable in "legalese".


The status could be invisible for gmail. The status is what shows to others in chat. On desktop and mobile, the status could be different.


Sure. This is easy: this means that your online status will be shown on the web on Skype.


Yes. Undocumented immigrants already have custody of their own children unless it has been taken away by court order. Their lack of legal immigration status does not take away their parental rights.



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