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Answered 2015-10-22 14:43:09

Iron 3 carbonate or Ferric carbonate is Fe2(CO3)3 its Molecular mass is 56x2 + (12+16x3)3 = 292

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Answered 2008-11-19 23:17:24

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Scandium carbonate, Sc2(CO3)3. x H2O; molecular mass is 296,96.


Scandium carbonate, Sc2(CO3)3. x H2O; molecular mass is 296,96.


The molecular Mass for sodium bicarbonate is 22.989770 + 1.00794 + 12.0107 + 15.9994*3


The molar mass of Fe2O3 is 55.845 (molar mass of iron)*2+16(molar mass of oxygen)*3, which comes out to be 159.69 grams per mole. Multiply that by the number of moles, and the answer is 223.57 grams.


The molar mass of aluminium carbonate - Al2(CO3)3 - is 233,99 g.


to find molar mass you add the molar mass of the carbons 3(amu)+ molar mass of the hydrogens 8(amu) to find molar mass you add the molar mass of the carbons 3(amu)+ molar mass of the hydrogens 8(amu)


Molar mass of ammonia = (14.01 + 3.03) (Molar mass of nitrogen + 3 times molar mass of hydrogen, as chemical formula of ammonia is NH3). Molar mass= 17.04 Molar mass x moles = mass 17.04 x 3 = 51.12 Mass of 3 moles of ammonia is 51.12g.


100.087 g/mol (from wikipedia) Molecular formula = CaCO3 Ca = 40 C = 12 O = 16 Molar mass = 40 + 12 + 3(16) = 100


Dividing by the molar mass of sodium carbonate, we deduce that there are 4.25 x 10-5 moles in 4.5 x 10-3 grams of sodium carbonate.


Nickel carbonate is NiCO3 with the molar mass 118,7 g.


Mwof Carbonate is 60.01 g/mol C 12.01 + O 16.00(3) 60.01 g/mol


The atomic weight (not molar mass !) of copper is 63,546(3).


The atomic weight (not molar mass) of tellurium is 127,60(3).


The molar mass of anhydrous Al(NO3)3 is 212,996 g.


Iron(ll) hydrogen carbonate Fe(HCO3)2 Iron(lll) hydrogen carbonate Fe(HCO3)3


assuming you mean sodium plus iron II carbonate, the products are iron plus sodium carbonate. iron is a transitional metal which can make +2 or +3 ions, and YOU need to state that in your word equation. there no such thing as iron carbonate, but there is such thing as iron II carbonate and iron III carbonate


Iron carbonate is formed from iron, carbon, and oxygen, where carbon and oxygen are in a carbonate ion (-2) form.Iron II carbonate (known as siderite) has the formula FeCO3, where iron has a valence of 2 and the carbonate ion has a valence of -2.Iron III carbonate (ferric carbonate) has the formula Fe2(CO3)2 where iron has a valence of 3.


The formula for iron (III) carbonate is Fe2(CO3)3. Each molecule of iron (III) carbonate contains 2 iron atoms, and 3 molecules of CO3.


Iron II carbonate contains the Fe2+ ion and has the formula FeCO3 Iron III carbonate contains the Fe3+ ion and has the formula Fe2(CO3)3.


The Molar mass of Nitroglycerine / C3H5(NO3)3 = 227.0865 g/mol


Ozone contains 3 molecules of oxygen. Molar mass of ozone is 48.


the molar mass of NH3 is 17.It is calculated as 14 + 3*1=17


It depends on which carbonate you are adding:Iron(II) carbonate + Sulphuric acid ----> Iron(II) sulphate + Water + Carbon dioxideFeCO3 + H2SO4 ----> FeSO4 + H2O + CO2Iron(III) carbonate + Sulphuric acid ----> Iron(III) sulphate + Water + Carbon dioxideFe2(CO3)3 + 3 H2SO4 ----> Fe2(SO4)3 + 3 H2O + 3 CO2


The formula mass of calcium carbonate, CaCO3 is 40.1 + 12.0 + 3(16.0) = 100.1Note that 73.4kg is equivalent to 73400g.Amount of CaCO3 = mass of pure sample/molar mass = 73400/100.1 = 733molThere are 733 moles of calcium carbonate in a 73.4kg pure sample.


The formula of calcium carbonate is CaCO3. Therefore, its molar mass is the sum of the atomic masses of calcium and carbon and three times the atomic mass of oxygen: 40.078 + 12.011 + 3(15.999) = 100.086. The number of moles in 10 g is 10 divided by the molar mass = 0.10 moles, to the number of significant digits justified by "10 g".



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