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Answered 2008-05-18 13:00:10

No. Many organisms are harmless, and the body will produce antibodies since the organisms are seen as foreign.

Many pathogens (harmful organisms) may not cause significant disease in many people. An example would be the poliovirus - in some people it causes paralysis; in others it causes minor illness, in others it causes no symptoms. In all cases, the person develops antibodies.

Vaccination exposes the person to the antigens without the pathogen being present, and so antibodies are formed before the exposure, and this process does not result in illness.

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How does a person become immune against a disease?

After a person has had a disease, the lymphocytes remain to produce more antibodies for that pathogen if the disease is encountered again. This is called IMMUNITY.


In what two ways can a person become immune to an infectious disease?

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May become cells that produce antibodies?

No. May becomes June.


The cell which are responsible for the production of the antibodies are?

white blood cells lymphocytes become immunoblasts, then plasma cells which produce antibodies.


Do white blood cells form antibodies which help you become immune to certain diseases?

the B-cell lymphocytes do produce antibodies.


What does a B cell become when activated?

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What would happen if your body didnt produce enough antibodies?

If your body didn't produce enough antibobies you'll become somehow vulnerable to diseases or in other words your chances to get ill will increase as compare to person whose body is producing "moderate" amount of antibodies. Any increase or decrease in actual amount of antibodies production can lead to problems. For example, AIDS is actually "acquired immunity deficiency syndrome" in which body fails to produce antibodies of "acquired immunity".And if your body produce antibodies more than actual amount you can suffer from "sensitivity" or "allergy" e.g dust allergy. If your body didn't produce enough antibobies you'll become somehow vulnerable to diseases or in other words your chances to get ill will increase as compare to person whose body is producing "moderate" amount of antibodies. Any increase or decrease in actual amount of antibodies production can lead to problems. For example, AIDS is actually "acquired immunity deficiency syndrome" in which body fails to produce antibodies of "acquired immunity".And if your body produce antibodies more than actual amount you can suffer from "sensitivity" or "allergy" e.g dust allergy.


Function of b cells in immune response?

After becoming immunocompetant in the bone marrow, some B-cells become memory cells while other B-cells produce plasma cells which produce antibodies. Antibodies flow throughout the bloodstream and provide humoral immunity.


How the mechanism of the antibody action works?

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What does a B-cell become when activated?

A B cell is a lymphocyte that, when activated by a T cell, becomes a plasma cell and produce antibodies.....


Does an injection of antibodies produce active immunity?

No. When you are immunized you are injected with an inactive version of the virus so your body learns how to fight it off and you become permanently immune.


When b cells are activated some mass produce antibodies while other become - to protect the body of a later date?

memory B cells


How can antibodies or vaccinations help us to become immune to diseases?

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How do helper T cell contribute to the body's defense against pathogens?

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What are the factor cause communicable disease to become epidemic and pandemic?

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What do helper B cells Memory cells and killer T cells do?

These are the main cells of the Immune system. B cells create antibodies, which attach themselves to the pathogen and disable it. Killer T Cells do exactly what their name describes: they kill cells that have become infected by viruses.


Can a person become immune to lupus naturally?

No, because lupus is not caused by a pathogen.


How do white cells fight pathogens?

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Why does passive immunity usually not last for very long?

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How do antimicrobials work?

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